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Enhancement of management of the official control system of food safety programme in Iraq








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    Book (stand-alone)
    Assuring Food Safety and Quality. Guidelines for Strengthening National Food Control Systems
    Food and Nutrition Paper 76
    2003
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    Effective national food control systems are essential to protect the health and safety of domestic consumers. They are also critical in enabling countries to assure the safety and quality of their foods entering international trade and to ensure that imported foods conform to national requirements. The new global environment for food trade places considerable obligations on both importing and exporting countries to strengthen their food control systems and to implement and enforce risk-based foo d control strategies. Consumers are taking unprecedented interest in the way food is produced, processed and marketed, and are increasingly calling for their Governments to accept greater responsibility for food safety and consumer protection. The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and the World Health Organization (WHO) have a strong interest in promoting national food control systems that are based upon scientific principles and guidelines, and which address all sect ors of the food chain. This is particularly important for developing countries as they seek to achieve improved food safety, quality and nutrition, but will require a high level of political and policy commitment. In many countries, effective food control is undermined by the existence of fragmented legislation, multiple jurisdictions, and weaknesses in surveillance, monitoring and enforcement. These guidelines seek to provide advice to national authorities on strategies to strengthen food contr ol systems to protect public health, prevent fraud and deception, avoid food adulteration and facilitate trade. They will enable authorities to choose the most suitable options for their food control systems in terms of legislation, infrastructure and enforcement mechanisms. The document delineates the overarching principles of food control systems, and provides examples of possible infrastructures and approaches for national systems. The target users of these Guidelines are national authorities concerned with ensuring food safety and quality in the interests of public health and consumer protection. The Guidelines will also be of assistance to a range of other stakeholders including consumer groups, industry and trade organizations, farmer groups and any other groups or associations that influence national policy in this area.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Strengthening national food control systems; A quick guide to assess capacity building needs 2007
    This guide is a companion document to the FAO Guidelines to assess capacity needs in the core components of a food control system1, and builds on and complement the FAO/WHO Guidelines for strengthening national food control systems2, which focus on the development of an integrated regulatory system for food control founded on a transparent, risk-based approach and the involvement of all the concerned stakeholders from farm to table. By providing a systematic approach to identify a nd prioritize needs and produce an action plan to strengthen the capacity of the food control system, this guide will improve the ability of food safety regulatory authorities to plan, implement and monitor their activities. It will also help to make the use of available resources more efficient and to raise additional resources for unmet needs.
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    Prioritization and Coordination of Capacity Building Activities - Food Safety Control System in Malaysia 2004
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    Food safety is increasingly becoming a global challenge both by virtue of its public health impact as well as its economic and political implications. Malaysia has established the National Food Safety and Nutrition Council in 2001, a multi- sectoral forum to set clear policies and strategies for the continuous improvement of the food safety programme. This Council is chaired by the Honorable Minister of Health and formulates policy on food safety and nutrition, which will be integrated, with oth er national policies to address, amongst others, health, economic and trade issues. The National Food Safety Policy was formulated in 2002 and it aims at providing direction to all stakeholders in establishing and implementing food safety measures, through collaborative efforts to safeguard human health. To effectively implement the National Food Safety Policy in a more coordinated and integrated manner, a National Plan of Action on Food Safety had also been formulated in 2002. The action plan c learly defines the role of each stakeholder and its successful implementation will depend on the support and commitment of all the relevant government agencies and stakeholders.

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