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A basic laboratory manual for the small-scale production and testing of I-2 Newcastle disease vaccine










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    Controlling Newcastle disease in village chickens
    A Field Manual
    2001
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    Rural poultry production is recognised as an important activity in all developing countries. However, over the past few decades, the focus has been on the production of commercial poultry in rural areas, while traditional village poultry systems have been largely ignored. Chickens in traditional village poultry systems provide scarce animal protein in the form of meat and eggs, and are available for sale or barter in societies where cash is not abundant. They are generally owned and ma naged by women and children (Guèye 2000; Spradbrow 1993-94). Village chickens also fulfill a range of other functions for which it is difficult to assign a monetary value. They are active in pest control, provide manure, are required for special festivals and to meet social obligations, they are essential for many traditional ceremonies and traditional treatment of illness (Alders 1996). Although the output of traditional village chickens in terms of weight gain and number of eggs pe r hen per year is low, it is obtained with minimum input in terms of housing, disease control, management and supplementary feeding (Tables 1 and 2). Any cost-effective strategy that increases the productivity of these birds will assist in poverty alleviation and the improvement of food security. The increased availability of village chickens and eggs should result in an improved intake of protein by the population and increased access to cash and other resources. Chickens are often es sential elements of female-headed and poor households. This is a particularly important contribution in areas where child malnutrition is common. Malnutrition has wider implications for development because protein-energy malnutrition in children inhibits their growth, increases their risk of morbidity, affects their mental development, and reduces their subsequent school performance and labour productivity (Pinstrup-Andersen et al.1993).
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    Veterinary laboratory testing protocols for priority zoonotic diseases in Africa 2023
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    Animal health laboratories play a crucial role in veterinary disease diagnosis and surveillance for the prevention and control of transboundary animal diseases, including those of economic impact or zoonotic threat with potential pandemic risk. Enhancing the diagnostic capacity of laboratories is an essential pillar for generating accurate data, particularly in settings where fundamental gaps and capacity constraints may prevent the early, rapid and reliable detection of many animal diseases. Importantly, the constant evolution of pathogens coupled with the rise of technology and assay development calls for ongoing guidance on current protocols and techniques. This is also particularly essential to ensure the use of carefully developed and validated tests. This compendium of protocols aims to contribute to capacity building efforts for sustainable and reliable functioning of animal health laboratories in Member States. It provides a practical and pragmatic resource for novel or updated validated diagnostic techniques to be introduced in accordance with a sustainable quality management system to ensure specific, accurate and reproducible results. The selected diseases included in this document are the most common priority zoonotic diseases (PZDs) identified in Africa. For each selected disease, the diagnostic protocols are explained focusing on assays that have been tested and validated by references laboratories to ensure their fitness for purpose. Laboratories around the world may use this compendium of protocols as guidance to update, enhance or expand their diagnostic assays.
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    Improved chicken breeds raised with vaccination in Lao PDR 2017
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    Chicken diseases can cause significant loss for farmers. Due to the frequency at which diseases affect chickens nearly every change of season, farmers get discouraged to raise chickens. The most common diseases often infecting chickens in rural areas are Newcastle disease and fowl cholera. This practice includes instructions on use of vaccines to reduce the disease causality among chickens. Additionally, this practice presents guidelines on chicken raising in flood or drought prone areas and describes the cost-benefit analysis of rearing improved chicken breeds with vaccination in Lao PDR. Improved chicken breeds are considered more efficient than native chickens because they grow faster and do not require as much water and feed.

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