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Review of fungal diseases in Poplar











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    Populus deltoides windbreak: its robust status in wheat production and soil nutrients in Indo-gangetic plains of northern India
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Agroforestry systems (AFS) with fast-growing woody crops such as poplar (Populus deltoides) are increasingly integrated into agricultural land because it is considered as a sustainable agricultural practice that combines primary production with other ecosystem services (ES). To optimize the efficiency of AFS, the suggestion is to develop well modified tree-crop integration by limiting competition for resources and capitalize on the coactions. However, yield data of various wheat varieties in AFS are inadequate, in particular for Populus deltoides windbreak at a age of four and five year old plantation. Here we focused on winter wheat varieties (WH-1105, HD-2967 and HD-943) during two consecutive years (2017-2019) comprising delimited by a row of deciduous poplar trees in East-West and North-South directions (East-West tree line divide farmlands into two aspects i.e. Northern and Southern and North-South tree line divide into Eastern and western aspect). While effects on crop produce were limited for all wheat varieties with the increasing distance from tree line, however, five years old poplar planted on field bunds exhibited significant reduction up to 3 m in grain yield of wheat from tree line for all the wheat varieties. The highest available soil N (210.5 kg ha–1), P (15.3 kg ha–1) and K (280.2 kg ha–1) were recorded near tree line at a distance of 3 m. To optimize the provisioning service of poplar windbreak AFS, the cultivation of highly shade tolerant wheat variety HD-2967 may be advisable over other wheat varieties towards the end of the rotation of poplar windbreak AFS. Keywords: Adaptive and integrated management, Food systems, Agriculture, Climate change, Human health and well-being ID: 3486118
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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Prevención de la propagación y la introducción de la marchitez del banano por Fusarium Raza 4 tropical (R4T)
    Guía para viajeros
    2020
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    Banana is an important crop for food security and ensuring the livelihoods of approximately 400 million people who depend on the crop either as a staple food or source of income, particularly in Asia, Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean. Plant pests and diseases can seriously affect agricultural production and livelihood of rural people. Fusarium wilt of banana is one of the key examples of crop devastation by a plant disease. This disease brought the banana export industry almost to a halt in the 20th century when the popular banana variety Gros Michel was devastated in Central America. The sector was saved by the introduction of the Cavendish variety, which is resistant to race 1 of the fungus. However, Cavendish bananas are now succumbing to a new, highly aggressive strain of the Fusarium wilt fungus, Tropical race 4 (TR4). Once established in a banana plantation, the fungus can survive in the soil for decades with its chlamydospores, even without banana plants. Scientific reports indicate the presence of TR4 in numerous countries in Asia (China – mainland and Taiwan Province), India, Indonesia, Israel, Jordan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Malaysia, Myanmar, Pakistan, Philippines, Oman, and Viet Nam); in Africa (Mozambique), in Australasia (Queensland and Northern Territory of Australia), in Europe (in Turkey and in an indoor Rainforest Biome in UK) and Latin America (Colombia).
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    Journal, magazine, bulletin
    FAO Food Chain Crisis Early Warning Bulletin
    Forecasting threats to the food chain affecting food security in countries and regions. No. 30, January-March 2019
    2019
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    During the period January to March 2019, Food Chain Crisis (FCC) threats are expected to occur in Africa, the Americas, Asia and Europe, where they may persist within a country, spread to neighbouring countries, remain latent, or re-emerge or amplify. The dynamics and likelihood of occurrence of FCC threats depend on a number of risk factors or drivers. These include agro-ecological factors (intensive farming systems, deforestation, overgrazing, etc.), climate change (such as droughts, extreme weather events, flooding, heavy rains, heatwaves, the El Niño-Southern Oscillation - ENSO or changes in vegetation cover or water temperature), human behaviour (cultural practices, conflicts and civil insecurity, trade, etc.) and natural disasters. In relation to food security, and according to the latest Crop Prospects and Food Situation report (January- March 2019), FAO estimates that, globally, 40 countries (31 in Africa, 8 in Asia, and 1 in the Americas) are in need of external assistance for food. Persisting conflicts continue to be the dominant factor driving high levels of severe food insecurity. Weather shocks have also adversely affected food availability and access. FCC threats might compound food insecurity in fragile countries stricken by weather shocks and conflicts. Twenty-nine plant and forest pests and diseases, locusts and animal and aquatic diseases were monitored and forecasted by FAO experts for the period January-March 2019. A total of 275 forecasts were conducted in 120 countries. According to the forecasts, the following pests and diseases represent a high to moderate risk to the food chain in some countries for the period January-March 2019: Rift Valley fever (RVF) in Africa, African swine fever (ASF) in Asia and Europe, Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD), Avian influenza (AI) in Africa and Asia, and Peste des petits ruminants (PPR) in Africa, Asia and Europe for Animal diseases and zoonoses; Fall armyworm (FAW), Banana fusarium wilt disease (BFWD) and Cassava mosaic disease (CMD) in Africa and Asia, and Cassava brown streak disease (CBSD), Wheat rust and Banana bunchy top disease (BBTD) in Africa for Plant pests and diseases; Desert Locust in Africa and Asia for Locusts; and Blue gum chalcid, Red gum lerp psyllid, Bronze bug and Polyphagous shot hole borer (PSHB) in Africa, Dry cone syndrome in Asia, Bark beetles in Europe and the Americas, and Pine processionary moth in Europe for Forest pests and diseases; Tilapia Lake Virus in the in the Americas and Asia, and Acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND) in Asia for Aquatic diseases.

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