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National demand for sawnwood in Cameroon

A barrier to or an opportunity for promotingthe use of timber resources of legal origin? Report









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    Policy brief
    Unlocking the potential of community timber
    The experience of the FAO-EU FLEGT Programme
    2021
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    Growing international and domestic demand for tropical timber has resulted in critical wood supply gaps for many tropical timber-producing countries, in some instances linked to a surge in illegal logging. Growing shortages of legal timber supply have necessitated the exploration of alternative sources of legally produced timber. Community forestry has been recognized as a potential source that could boost legal timber supply on the domestic market of tropical timber-producing countries. This brief seeks to share the experience accrued across Asia, Africa and Latin America in addressing and overcoming challenges faced in legal frameworks, market access, and capacity building.
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    Article
    The farmer with agroforestry practices might be the “next forester”?
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    The main tropical Agro-Forestry Systems (AFS) are often complex, multi-stage and multi-species. Apart from home gardens intended for self-consumption, AFS are often based on a main crop with economic, or export value: rubber, coconut, cocoa, coffee, cloves, vanilla, damar, durian... with also local fruit trees, fast-growing fuelwood trees and timber trees for self-consumption or sale. This diversification in AFS focused on industrial crops, often comes after a period of deforestation since the end of the 19th century during the period of the colonial empires. Wood can also come from species used for services such as providing shade for coffee or cocoa trees. Wood species are also common in the local forest (Indonesia/Thailand), reflecting farmers' strategy of conserving local resources. In other cases, native species have almost entirely disappeared (e.g. clove AFS on the East Coast of Madagascar) in favor of introduced species. Sometime, the main crop is also a timber specie such a rubber (used for furniture), Durian, Litchi... Now that most forests have almost disappeared in central plains with easy access in Southeast Asia (with potential commercial value), timber from AFS is becoming a real challenge that depends mainly on tree tenure and local regulation. Today, the current demand for tropical wood has decreased considerably since the golden age of deforestation (1980/2010) due to resource depletion and a global demand towards products from dedicated plantations from Europe or elsewhere. The market has changed from a massive use of tropical timber for multiple purposes to a limited use for specific purposes. In this context, timber in AFS, often produced at marginal cost, can be an alternative to produce valuable timber. We consider in this sense that the farmer in tropical regions with agroforestry practices might be the “forester of the future”. Beside, AFS with timber might significantly contribute to positive externalities and eco- systemic services for a better sustainability. Keywords: agroforestry, forester, timber, diversification. ID 3639413
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    Book (series)
    Global forest sector outlook 2050: Assessing future demand and sources of timber for a sustainable economy
    Background paper for The State of the World’s Forests 2022
    2022
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    The global threats to climate, biodiversity and a healthy environment are mainly caused by the excessive use of non-renewable materials. The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), in collaboration with the International Tropical Timber Organization (ITTO) and Unique Consultancy, elaborated a Global Forest Sector Outlook 2050 to assess the capacity of wood supply to support a sustainable bioeconomy. The report presents a business-as-usual scenario, based on the Global Forest Products Model (GFPM), and a bioeconomy scenario based on the impact of increased consumption of two wood products consolidated in the market: mass timber and manmade cellulose fiber. The publication assesses the market outlook for demand for primary processed wood products, demand and supply of industrial roundwood, wood energy, and forest employment and investments. From a deman-driven perspective, it discusses the actual forest resource base and production needs to supply future demand by factoring in the use of wood residues and enhanced productivity in the forest sector, as well as the influence of megatrends and policy objectives.

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