Thumbnail Image

The Outlook for Agriculture and Rural Development in the Americas

A perspective on Latin America 2011-2012






Also available in:

Related items

Showing items related by metadata.

  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    The Outlook for Agriculture and Rural Development in the Americas: A perspective on Latin America and Caribbean, 2015-2016 2016
    Also available in:

    In this, the sixth in the series of documents entitled “Outlook for Agriculture and Rural Development in the Americas,” the Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC), the Regional Office for Latin America and the Caribbean of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), and the Inter-American Institute for Cooperation on Agriculture (IICA) analyze the trends in, and outlook for, the macroeconomic and sectoral contexts, agriculture, rural well-being, and policies and the institutional framework in the sector. The document presents proposals for policies needed to enable the region’s agriculture to regain its former buoyancy and to enhance the development of rural areas. It also includes recommendations designed to mitigate the impact of the economic slowdown in agriculture, spur higher agricultural productivity in the region, foster the integrated management of natural resources, and facilitate the successful incorporation of family farmers, young people, and rural women into agricultural value chains.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    Ukraine: Meat sector review
    Country highlights prepared under the FAO/EBRD Cooperation
    2014
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Worldwide productivity growth throughout the meat production chain has been significant in recent years. Meat production has grown about 300 percent in the last 50 years. Meat is anticipated to be one of the fastest growing commodities due to increasing incomes, changing consumer preferences in many emerging economies, economies of scale and structural changes which are lowering costs of meat production and meat prices (poultry and pig meat in particular). Global meat consumption c ontinues to grow at one of the highest rates of any major agricultural commodity. Growth in developing countries is projected to capture 82 percent of the additional global consumption by 2021. According to the OECD-FAO Agricultural Outlook 2012-2021, growth in meat demand will be driven mostly by the large Asian economies, oil exporting countries and Latin America, where income gains are expected to be significant, and by emerging economies where income growth and urbanization wil l strengthen the consumption of animal proteins at the expense of foods of vegetal origin. Poultry meat as the cheapest and most accessible source of meat protein will lead this anticipated growth, globally overtaking pig meat as the largest source of meat by 2021. The six year period under review in this study is 2005 to 2010. Based on the review, forecasts are made on the mid-term prospects of the meat sector. Despite the fact that meat production in Ukraine grew in absolute term s during 2005–2010, its contribution to the Ukrainian GDP decreased from 4.4 percent to 3.2 percent. During those six years, Ukraine increased meat production in terms of volume by 39 percent. All of the increase occurred on commercial farms, while production on smallholder (household) farms remained largely unchanged. Poultry was the fastest growing segment of the meat sector. Despite a sharp decline in import tariff protection following WTO accession and the negative impact of the global financial crisis on trade and consumers’ incomes, which narrowed domestic profit margins in the short term, the meat sector managed to rebound and continue to grow.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    Food Outlook, June 2006 2006
    The recent months saw commodity markets as a whole becoming more volatile with a steady upward trend in prices. In agricultural markets, some important food and feed commodities gained on supply tightness and stronger demand while in the energy complex and metals, the tighter supply and demand balance resulted in a steep increase in prices. Amid political uncertainties and surging energy prices, agricultural markets over the past year have also had to confront abnormal incidences of natural disa sters, ranging from devastating hurricanes to fast spreading animal diseases. Based on current indications, several agricultural commodities are likely to experience still more unstable months ahead and, in most instances, the fundamentals point to even further gains in prices. This eventuality seems strongest for cereals, as world cereal demand is forecast to surpass its supply in the new season and push down stocks to an uncomfortably low level. For sugar, while a further surge in prices from the current high levels could be considered as less probable, the main risk remains the continuing price volatility. For the oilseed complex, as well as meat and dairy, fundamentals at this point in time do not support a tightening in the markets and the near-term price prospects are more on the downside instead. Against this background of mixed outlook but generally firm prices, FAO is forecasting an increase of over 2 percent in the world food import bill in 2006 compared to 2005. The increase is expected to be strongest for cereals and sugar but smallest for meat. Given their higher share as importers of food and feed, the developing countries’ bill is forecast to grow by 3.5 percent while that of the Low Income Food Deficit Countries is forecast to jump by nearly 7 percent.

Users also downloaded

Showing related downloaded files

No results found.