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Farmed seafood: combatting lies with facts








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    The rise of plant-based seafood 2022
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    Plant-based for seafood are being produced using a range of ingredients and processes. The growth of the sector has largely been spearheaded by start-ups, many of which claim to be providing an ethical and sustainable alternative to farmed and wild-caught seafood. As the sector evolves, it is now also beginning to attract the attention of corporate food producers. Currently, plant-based seafood is not widespread globally, with the bulk of producers being based in high-income countries. Most consumers can source traditional seafood at lower prices than plant-based products. If this business model does not change, this niche sector may struggle to penetrate the mass market.
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    Exchange rates and the seafood trade 2014
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    Seafood trade has increased dramatically in recent years, exposing more seafood buyers as well as sellers to exchange rate risk. In this report we investigate the channels, through which exchange rate risk influences seafood trade and discuss some risk-mitigating approaches. Somewhat surprising, exchange rate movements seem to have a relatively moderate impact on seafood trade flows. Other factors, such as market access, aggregate demand and ability to supply seem more important.
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    Book (series)
    Seafood certification and developing countries: Focus on Asia 2018
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    Third party certification of fish and seafood products (ecolabels) have expanded rapidly since the first seafood ecolabel appeared on the market in the late 1990s. Developing country producers and exporters have raised concerns about ecolabel requirements acting as technical barriers to trade for access to international markets, while consumers in their own domestic markets have not shown much appetite for certified seafood. This research provides a review of recent literature on seafood ecolabels, focusing on Asian markets where uptake by consumers and retailers has not been as prolific as in European and North American markets. Analysis of selected third party certification schemes identifies key requirements that may act as barriers for small-scale producers in developing countries to obtain certification. Case studies provide examples to support the theoretical analysis. Recommendations based on the findings can guide developing country governments in supporting their fisheries and aquaculture sector to achieve certification and thus improve access to markets.

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