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Feeds for Artisanal Shrimp Culture in India. Their Development and Evaluation - BOBP/REP/52










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    Book (stand-alone)
    Report of the Seminar on the Mud Crab Culture and Trade - BOBP/REP/51
    Swat Thani, Thailand; November 5-8,1991
    1992
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    The mud crab, Scylla sp.. found throughout the Indo-Pacific region. has become increasingly popular by virtue of its meat quality and large size. While regional trade in the species has been growing. very little attention has been given to the fishery and culture in the Bay of Bengal region. The fishery, culture and trade in Scylla sp. i s small-scale and involves artisanal fisherfolk, thus attracting the interest of the Bay of Bengal Programme (BOBP). As little is known of the state of the fishery, culture and trade. it was felt that a regional seminar might be an appropriate medium for an exchange of information among BOBP’s member countries. A seminar would also provide an opportunity to update knowledge of the industry. Southern Thailand, particularly the province of Surat Thani, has long been a centre for the capture and culture of the mud crab. With the proximity of the provincial brackishwater station and the opportunity to observe the industry first-hand; the town of Surat Thani promised to be an ideal venue for the seminar. And so, BOBP, in collaboration with the Department of Fisheries (DOCF) of the Government of Thailand, convened the seminar from November 5 to 8, 1991 Representatives from all the BOBP member countries, as well as the Philippines, Australia and U.S.A., attended. Aquaculturists, scientists, businessmen, socio-economists, feed manufacturers and development strategists were among the 54 participants. There were five sessions: Biol ogy and natural resources. Seed supply, Culture, Trade and a combined session with focus on Extension, Credit and Economic. During these sessions, 22 papers a nd six backgrounders were presented. To our knowledge, this was the first seminar in the region, and perhaps the world, devoted exclusively to the mud crab.
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    Project
    Further Exploratory Fishing for Large Pelagic Species in South Indian Waters - BOBP/WP/91 1993
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    Despite the substantial increase in the traditional fishing fleet of small craft in Tamil Nadu, India, production has remained more or less constant in the last few years, indicating that fisheries resources within the range of this fleet have been fully exploited. From the Sixties, however, introduced small fishing craft in neighbouring Shri Lanka have been operating in deep sea waters and reporting good catches of large pelagic species, particularly shark. Although Tamil Naduis geographicall y well placed for the exploitation of these resources, the potential has not been realized. In order to introduce fishing for large pelagic species in Tamil Nadu by demonstrating the experience in Shri Lanka, a subproject for fishing demonstrations was established in 1989. The executing agency was the Tamil Nadu Department of Fisheries with technical and financial support from the Bay of Bengal Programme (BOBP), which had played a part in this development in Shri Lanka. Two 10 m FRP boats (S RL-15) tested in Shri Lanka’s commercial off shore fisheries were selected for exploratory fishing trials from Chinnamuttam fishing harbour near Cape Comorin and Royapuram fishing harbour in Madras. Results and conclusions of the Chinnamuttam and Madras trials are reported in this paper. Craft and gear details, as well as earlier trials at Chinnamuttam, have already been reported in greater detail in BOBP/WP/81 — Exploratory Fishing for Large Pelagic Species in South Indian Waters.
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    Book (series)
    Feeding and feed management of Indian major carps in Andhra Pradesh, India 2013
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    This study reviews the aquaculture of Indian major carps, rohu (Labeo rohita), catla (Catla catla) and mrigal (Cirrhinus cirrhosus) with special reference to current feeding and feed management practices in Andhra Pradesh, India. The study is based on a survey of 106 farmers from four regions in Andhra Pradesh (Kolleru, Krishna, West Godavari, and Nellore). The study was undertaken between December 2009 to July 2010. Kolleru and the surrounding districts of Krishna and West Godavari ar e the primary culture areas. In Nellore district, Indian major carp culture is practiced at a lower intensity to that practiced in Kolleru. In East Godavari district, Indian major carps are primarily cultured in polyculture systems with either tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon) or freshwater prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii). While the study primarily focused on the feed management practices associated with Indian major carp production, management practices that are used under polycultur e conditions with other species groups were also assessed. The study revealed that mash feed was the most popular and widely used feed type. De-oiled rice bran was used as the principal feed ingredient followed by groundnut cake and cotton seed cake. All the farmers reported using de-oiled rice bran, followed by groundnut cake (56 percent farmers), cotton seed cake (40 percent), raw rice bran (30 percent) and other mash feed ingredients. The poor quality of the mash feed ingredients, especially the de-oiled rice bran, groundnut cake, and cotton seed cake was an important issue of concern to the farmers. Commercially manufactured pellet feeds were used by 33 percent of the farmers to compliment their mash feeds, with the majority electing to use sinking pellets. Since 2007, there has been a marked increase in the use of commercially manufactured aquafeeds, most notably for the large scale production of the striped catfish Pangasianodon hypophthalmus. Grow-out f armers feeding mash feeds used variants of a bag feeding method known as rope and pole feeding. In Nellore district some farmers practiced hapa feeding, while in East Godavari district, farmers fed fish in both the culture ponds (bag feeding) and hapas. Tiger shrimp or freshwater prawns were fed in these ponds using broadcast feeding methods. In the nursery and rearing ponds, the commonly used feed ingredients included groundnut cake, de-oiled rice bran and raw rice bran. The most co mmon feeding practice was broadcast feeding. Rohu broodstock that were collected during the breeding season were fed in a similar manner to the fish in the grow-out production systems. Catla broodstock was segregated from the other culture species, and fed a diet comprising soybean cake, dried fish, and a mineral mixture. Constraints to Indian major carp production were identified, and research and development needs characterized.

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