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Swedish experience relating to the control of Salmonella in the national herd, with specific focus on the salmonella policy related to poultry production, and the results regarding Salmonella prevalence and human salmonellosis incidence

Country Report proposed by Sweden








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    Book (series)
    Interventions for the control of non-typhoidal Salmonella in beef and pork 2016
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    Nontyphoidal Salmonella spp. are estimated to cause 93.8 million cases of acute gastroenteritis and 155,000 deaths globally each year, approximately 85% of which are estimated to be foodborne, thus having a significant public health and economic impact on society. Pork products are among the top food-borne sources of Salmonella globally. While beef products have been implicated in several large outbreaks in recent years. Contamination of beef and pork with Salmonella can also negatively impact t he agri-food and trade sectors due to costly recalls of products and by limiting market access. In order to support the development of Codex “Guidelines for the Control of Nontyphoidal Salmonella spp. in Beef and Pork Meat”, FAO and WHO conducted a systematic review on the efficacy of all possible interventions from primary production to the end of processing to control Salmonella in pork and beef. Data was also sought directly from Member countries. All this information was then considere d by the expert meeting which was convened on 28 September to 2 October 2015 at FAO Headquarters, Rome, Italy. this meeting provided recommendations on potential control measures for the control of Salmonella in beef and pork, and where possible their efficacy, based on the available scinetific evidence to support the development of science based international guidance in this area. The outcome will be used by the Codex Alimentarius, the OIE and Member countries when addressing the problems pos ed by Salmonella in the beef and pork chains.
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    Book (series)
    Measures for the control of non-typhoidal Salmonella spp. in poultry meat
    Meeting report
    2023
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    In response to a request from the 52nd Session of the Codex Committee on Food Hygiene (CCFH), the FAO/WHO Joint Expert Meetings on Microbiological Risk Assessment (JEMRA) convened this meeting, to collate and assess the most recent scientific information relating to the control of non-typhoidal (NT)-Salmonella spp. in chicken meat. The assessment included a review of the Codex Guidelines for the Control of Campylobacter and Salmonella in Chicken Meat (CXG 78-2011). The Campylobacter will be reviewd by another meeting. The expert consultation noted that no single control measure was sufficiently effective in reducing either the prevalence or the level of contamination of broilers and poultry meat with NT-Salmonella spp. Instead, it was emphasized that control strategies based on multiple intervention steps would have the greatest impact on controlling NT-Salmonella spp. in the broiler production chain. This report describes the output of this expert meeting and the advice herein is useful for both risk assessors and risk managers, at national and international levels and those in the food industry working to control the hazard in poultry.
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    Review of animal welfare legislation in the beef, pork, and poultry industries 2014
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    This study aims to give an overview of the legal framework that applies to animal welfare in the EU and a group of non-EU countries. It sets out the EU animal welfare legislation that applies to beef cattle, pigs, broilers (the chickens reared for meat) and egg-laying hens while they are on the farm, in transit and at slaughter. It then examines the implementation of the EU legislation in three EU member states, namely, Italy in Southern Europe, Poland in Central and Eastern Europe and the Unite d Kingdom in North-West Europe. The study then focuses on six non-EU countries: Egypt, Morocco, the Russian Federation, Serbia, Turkey and Ukraine. For each of these countries, it provides an overview of the legislation on animal welfare applying to beef, pork and poultry production systems. It goes on to compare the legislation of these countries with that of the EU and to examine how it is implemented. Next, an overview is provided of the animal welfare standards of four international organiza tions: the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE), the Council of Europe and the International Finance Corporation (IFC), which is part of the World Bank Group. As the progress on animal welfare is increasingly driven by private sector and civil society initiatives, a number of private standards established by major food businesses and animal welfare organizations are also analyzed.

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