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Digitalization and child labour in agriculture

Exploring blockchain and Geographic Information Systems to monitor and prevent child labour in Ghana’s cocoa sector. Design paper









Termeer, E., Vos, B., Bolchini, A., Van Ingen, E. and Abrokwa, K. 2023. Digitalization and child labour in agriculture – Exploring blockchain and Geographic Information Systems to monitor and prevent child labour in Ghana’s cocoa sector. Design paper. Rome, FAO. 





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