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Legal developments and progressive realization of the right to adequate food

Right to Food Thematic Study 3











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    Document
    Institutional framework for the right to adequate food
    Right to Food Thematic Study 2
    2014
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    This study shows how an institutional framework can efficiently support the realization of the right to adequate food and – mainly with the guidance of Guidelines 5 and 18 –examines important advances that have taken place since the adoption of the Right to Food Guidelines through various structural dimensions of an institution. Executive and legislative bodies, human rights institutions as well as judicial and quasi-judicial bodies, at national, regional and global levels, have been established or strengthened over the past decade so as to further contribute to the realization of the right to adequate food of all. Progresses are seen in various regions and across societies with different historical, cultural, social and economic contexts. Still, at national, regional and global levels, there are various actions that can be taken to further increase the contribution of institutional frameworks to the eradication of hunger, malnutrition and the realization of the right to adequate food of all over the coming years. Some of these actions include: the entrustment of clear and broad mandates on the right to adequate food; the empowerment and funding of adequate human resources; and an active and effective participation of all relevant stakeholders in order to strengthen accountability and transparency.
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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Linkages between the Voluntary Guidelines for Securing Sustainable Small-Scale Fisheries and the Voluntary Guidelines to Support the Progressive Realization of the Right to Adequate Food 2020
    Both the CFS Voluntary Guidelines to Support the Progressive Realization of the Right to Adequate Food in the Context of National Food Security (Right to Food Guidelines) and the Voluntary Guidelines for Securing Sustainable Small-Scale Fisheries in the Context of Food Security and Poverty Eradication (SSF Guidelines) hold the realization of the right to adequate food as their main objective. The Right to Food Guidelines emphasizes the role of small-scale producers in several sections and the SSF Guidelines as their first objective call “to enhance the contribution to fisheries to food security and nutrition and support the realization to the right to adequate food”. This brief is part of a series drawing attention to the mutually reinforcing nature of four global normative instruments developed through the Committee on World Food Security (CFS) and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) SSF Guidelines. The four CFS instruments with direct links to the SSF Guidelines are the CFS Voluntary Guidelines to Support the Progressive Realization of the Right to Adequate Food in the Context of National Food Security (Right to Food Guidelines), the CFS Voluntary Guidelines on the Responsible Governance of Tenure of Land, Fisheries and Forests in the Context of National Food Security (VGGT), the CFS Principles for Responsible Investment in Agriculture and Food Systems (CFS-RAI Principles) and the CFS Framework for Action for Food Security and Nutrition in Protracted Crisis (CFS-FFA). Their synergistic implementation can make a difference in enabling small-scale fisheries to contribute to sustainable food systems by providing highly nutritious food for local communities, and it can make a difference for consumers in national, regional, and international markets. The briefs aim at highlighting key commonalities among these CFS instruments and the SSF Guidelines, and provide some illustrative examples to inspire action by all, including by governments, small-scale fisheries organizations or other civil society organizations, the private sector, non-governmental organizations, and research and development partners.
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    Document
    Cluster evaluation of two right to food projects - Annexes
    Err:509
    2015
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    The right to food has been recognized as a human right since the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in 1948, in numerous binding and nonbinding legal instruments, notably Article 11 of the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (ICESCR). However, guidance on its implementation was not available until 2004 when, after two years of negotiations under the umbrella of FAO, Member States adopted the “Voluntary Guidelines to Support the Progressive Realization of the Right t o Adequate Food in the Context of National Food Security” (RtFG), the only intergovernmental text clarifying the concrete measures that States should take to implement the human right to adequate food. Since then, FAO’s Right to Food team has supported the implementation of the guidelines as one of the most authoritative and complete guiding documents available for building a sound, national human rights-based food security and nutrition (FSN) framework. Over the years, FAO has been promoting th e Guidelines through dedicated staff (the Right to Food Team in ESA, legal officer in LEG and staff in decentralized offices), the delivery of policy assistance to States and the publication of a number of studies and a toolkit. Operationally, the Right to Food Team conducted a number of specific operational projects at regional and country levels.

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