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Agricultural Growth in West Africa: Market and Policy Drivers










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    West African Food Systems and Changing Consumer Demands 2017
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    Fueled by a burgeoning population, urbanisation and income growth, West African food demand is rapidly transforming, with striking increases in total quantities demanded, growing preference for convenience, diversification of diets towards more perishable products, and an increased concern for product quality. These changes provide great opportunities for the West African food system to increase production, value added, job creation and food security. Yet a number of structural and policy constr aints continue to threaten the ability of West Africa to seize these opportunities. This paper analyses the key drivers of change and their implications on the various demands facing the food system. It then looks at how different elements of the food system respond to evolving demands, discusses the constraints to more effective responses, and finally considers some policy implications and key recommendations, particularly in the context of the ECOWAS-led efforts to develop and implement more e ffective regional agricultural policies.
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    Challenges and Opportunities for African Agriculture and Food Security: high food prices, climate change, population growth, and hiv and aids
    Expert Meeting on How to feed the World in 2050
    2009
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    Over the past decade, economic and agricultural growth in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) has resumed. The secular downward trend in agricultural prices ended in the early 1990s; growing incomes in Asia and Africa, combined with continued rapid population growth, are fueling food demand, which is expected to lead to a gradual upward trend in international real agricultural prices. For Africa the major agricultural growth opportunities will be in regional and domestic markets for food staples. E conomic and agricultural growth have resumed despite continued high population, the AIDS crisis, and the onset of measurable climate change. Climate change will provide both challenges and opportunities, and countries need to strengthen their general capacities to deal with stresses and weather shocks in line with general agricultural development priorities. Population growth adds to the challenge of increasing per capita income and feeding Africa. It will also drive further agricultur al intensification and in many place has led to improvements, rather than deterioration in the natural resource base. The fight against HIV and AIDS in rural areas is lagging badly and will need to be intensified via participatory approaches to prevention, expansion of HIV and AIDS treatment to rural areas, and massive improvements in rural safety nets. To seize the agricultural growth opportunities that derive from recent policy and price trends, SSA will have to support economic grow th via continued sound macroeconomic policies, further improvements in the investment climate, and investments in infrastructure and institutions.
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    Agricultural Transformation Centres in Africa - Practical guidance to promote inclusive agro-industrial development 2019
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    Over the next ten years, the African rural space will be the theatre of profound changes as the activities envisaged for agricultural transformation are drastically scaled up. Increased food demand and changing consumption habits driven by demographic factors, such as population growth and urbanization, are already leading to a rapid increase of net food imports, opening a huge opportunity for the agribusiness sector of many African countries. Against this backdrop and in line with its mission to spur sustainable economic development and social progress, the African Development Bank (AfDB) in 2016 launched Feed Africa, a strategy that is intended to contribute substantially to the transformation of African agriculture by 2025, and to reverse Africa’s dependence on imported foods. As part of this strategy, AfDB is promoting the concept of staple crops processing zones (SCPZs), which are agrobased spatial development initiatives, designed to concentrate agro-processing activities within areas of high agricultural potential to boost productivity and integrate the production, processing and marketing of selected commodities. As essential components, SCPZs include an agro-processing hub, a number of agricultural transformation centres (ATCs) and agricultural production areas. The ATCs are designed to link smallholder farmers to the agro-processing hub and are centres strategically located in high production areas, with the aim of serving as aggregation points to accumulate products from the community to supply the agro-processing hub for further value addition, or to send them to centres of great demand for distribution and retail to consumers. Under the technical support of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), this study has attempted to assess the feasibility and applicability of the ATC concept to selected regions in Zambia, Côte d’Ivoire and the United Republic of Tanzania. Findings from the field have demonstrated the potential of ATCs to address community needs and constraints for a range of selected value chains, and have helped to identify different ATCs models that could possibly work in each specific context.

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