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The Global Strategy for Prevention and Control of H5N1 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza - October 2008








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    REPORT - GLOBAL PROGRAMME FOR THE PREVENTION AND CONTROL OF HIGHLY PATHOGENIC AVIAN INFLUENZA 2008
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    Following the outbreak and spread of the H5N1 virus strain of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) in Southeast Asia in late 2003-early 2004, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE), in close collaboration with the World Health Organization (WHO), developed the FAO/OIE Global Strategy for the Prevention and Control of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza. The strategy focused resources on fighting and eradicating HPAI in animals in order to avert spread of the virus to humans and an eventual human influenza pandemic. In order to meet its responsibilities under the Global Strategy, FAO developed a Global Programme for the Prevention and Control of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza. That programme, which is implemented by the Emergency Centre for Transboundary Animal Diseases (ECTAD) at FAO headquarters in Rome, emphasises the need for both global and regional coordination in order to help HPAI infected and at- risk countries develop effective prevention and control programmes. The Global Programme is regularly revised and updated to reflect the changing disease situation, to report how FAO expertise is being utilised to combat HPAI, and to report accurately on activities and budget monitoring.
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    Potential risk of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) spreading through wild water bird migration
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    2005
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    There is a potential that Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) subtype H5N1 might be carried along migration routes of wild water birds to densely populated areas in the south Asian subcontinent and along migratory flyways to Europe. Recent outbreaks of HPAI in Russia and Kazakhstan (August, 2005) attest to this fact. Looking at the major bird migration routes (Fig. 1), the HPAI H5N1 virus could possibly spread from Siberia to the Caspian and Black Sea areas in the foreseeable future. Some w ild water birds are nesting in the newly AI affected areas in Novosibirsk and Altai in Russia and will migrate to the above-mentioned areas for winter or stop-over on their way to Africa and Europe. Bird migration routes run across Azerbaijan, Iran, Iraq, Georgia, Ukraine and some Mediterranean countries, where bird flu outbreaks are a possibility. Also India and Bangladesh, which currently seem to be uninfected, are at risk because both areas harbour large numbers of domestic duck and the count ries are situated along one of the major migratory routes. They have the potential to become new large endemic foci of HPAI infection. Additionally, spring migration of 2006 may result in the spread of HPAI H5N1 virus across European Russia, because birds migrating from Europe and European Russia and Siberia have common wintering areas in Southwest Asia.
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    Global Programme for the prevention and control of H5N1 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza - February 2008 2008
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    This document is a revision and update of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) Global Programme for the Prevention and Control of H5N1 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza, which was first formulated at the end of 2005 . It describes how FAO implements its responsibilities as presented in the joint FAO/OIE Global Strategy for the Prevention and Control of H5N1 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza . Whereas the FAO/OIE Global Strategy sets a 10-year vision for immediate-, m edium- and long-term responses to HPAI, the FAO Global Programme is time-bound for three years, 2006-2008, and addresses immediate response needs while maintaining a perspective on the longer-term strategy. FAO’s Global Programme is designed in line with this vision and the overall objective “to safeguard animal health and livelihoods from the threat of HPAI and mitigate the risk of a human pandemic through prevention and control of H5N1 HPAI in the poultry sector at three inter-connected l evels: global, regional and national”.

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