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World aquaculture 2015: a brief overview










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    Meeting
    Promote responsible production and use of feed and feed ingredients for sustainable growth of aquaculture in Asia-Pacific. Asia-Pacific Fishery Commission Thirty-fifth session (APFIC)
    Cebu, the Philippines, 11-13 May 2018
    2018
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    Aquaculture has been one of the fastest growing food production sectors in the past three decades globally. The annual growth rate was at an average of 8 percent from 1984 to 2014. As the major contributor to the world aquaculture production, Asia achieved an average annual growth of 8.4 percent in the same period, and the production reached 92.8 tonnes in 2014, accounting for 91.7 percent. Currently, Asian aquaculture supplies some 60 percent of food fish for consumption while contributing significantly to rural livelihood. The rapid production growth has been largely attributed to intensification of production with increasing dependence on artificial feeding. Finfish and crustacean are two major groups of cultured aquatic animals that require artificial feeding, in the forms of commercial feeds, farm-made feeds, and fresh feeds. Their global production reached 56.8 million tonnes in 2014, including some 6.92 million tonnes of crustacean and 49.9 million tonnes of finfish. With silver carp, catla and bighead (filter feeder on plankton) excluded, it was estimated that 38.8 million tonnes of finfish out of the total 49.9 million tonnes were produced through entire or partial feeding based on the feeding habit and common culture practices. Therefore, aquaculture commodities produced through partial or complete feeding accounted for 45.2 percent globally in 2014, while it was only 42.5 percent 10 years ago. The total production of aquaculture species depending on artificial feeding has increased by 97.9 percent in the past 10 years.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Regional Review on Status and Trends in Aquaculture Development in Asia-Pacific 2015 2017
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    Aquaculture is still the fastest growing food producing sector in the world. In 2014, aquaculture produced 73.8 million tonnes of aquatic animals, with an estimated first-sale value of US$160.2 billion and 27.3 million tonnes of aquatic plants worth US$5.6 billion., in 2014. Almost all fish produced from aquaculture are destined for human consumption, although by-products may be used for non-food purposes. Thirty-five countries produced more farmed than wild-caught fish in 2014 and four top prod ucers in Asia-Pacific, namely, Bangladesh, China, India and Viet Nam are included in this group. Historically, the Asia-Pacific region (in particular China, South Asia and South-east Asia sub-regions) has dominated global aquaculture production, both in quantity and value; the region contributed 65.2 million tonnes of aquatic animals, amounting to 88 percent of the global total in 2014. The value of Asia-Pacific regional aquatic animal production in 2014 was 79 percent of the global total, amoun ting to US$127 billion. In terms of consumption, it is apparent that more fish and shrimp are now consumed in Asia than ever. While this trend is continuing, the demand for improved high quality, nutritious, safer to eat and easy to cook (precooked) aquatic products will continue in the region. While many countries in Asia-Pacific have made commendable efforts to set up policies, administrative, legal and regulatory frameworks to properly develop and manage aquaculture, some countries in the re gion are still lagging behind. And in some of the countries who have made conducive policies, their implementation is delayed by the lack of financial and skilled human resources. Policies and regulations may be enacted, but unless there are sufficient government personnel with adequate skills and financial resources to monitor and enforce them, they will remain ineffective. This issue must be addressed without delay if the aquaculture sector in Asia-Pacific is to further continue to develop sus tainably.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Genetic resources for microorganisms of current and potential use in aquaculture
    Thematic background study
    2021
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    Aquaculture is the farming of aquatic organisms ranging from microbes to shellfish and finfish. Fisheries production from the capture of wild fish has remained fairly constant since the late 1980s and it is the increase in production from aquaculture that has led to substantial growth in fish production for human consumption, with aquaculture contributing more than wildcaught fisheries for the first time in 2014 and this trend is likely to continue. Global aquaculture production accounted for 44.1 percent of total global fish production, including production for non-food uses, in 2014. The share of fish produced by aquaculture for human consumption increased from 26 percent in 1994 to about 50 percent in 2014, with 73.8 million tonnes of fish valued at USD 160 billion being harvested from aquaculture in 2014. In facing the challenge of providing food to a growing human population predicted to reach 9.7 billion by 2050, fish consumption, especially produced from aquaculture, has an important role to play. The Second International Conference on Nutrition (ICN2) held in 2014 adopted the Rome Declaration on Nutrition that highlighted the key role of fish in meeting the nutritional needs of this growing population. Global per capita fish consumption has increased from under 10 kg in the 1960s to approach 20 kg in 2014 and 2015 and now provides over 3.1 billion people with approaching 20 percent of their animal protein intake, enhancing people’s diets around the world. Microbes play a critically important role in the cycling of nutrients in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems globally. Marine microbes are responsible for approximately half of global primary production and play a huge role in the cycling of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and other nutrients. Microbes have a central role in sustaining life on earth and lie at the centre of such as sustainability and climate change. Microbes also have a direct, central and critically important role in fisheries and aquaculture. Microbes in natural marine and freshwater ecosystems are key components of food webs, primary and secondary production and nutrient cycling. A wide range of microbes are used directly in aquaculture as live feeds, probiotics, and in filtration systems. Aquatic microorganisms are therefore indispensable resources for growth of shellfish and finfish in natural aquatic ecosystems and in aquaculture.

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