Thumbnail Image

Vegetable protective cropping and contractual farming in Samoa










Also available in:
No results found.

Related items

Showing items related by metadata.

  • Thumbnail Image
    Project
    Strengthening Capacity of Youth for Employment and Livelihood in Agriculture - TCP/SAM/3603 2020
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Approximately 80 percent of the population of Samoa resides in rural areas, yet the contribution of the agriculture sector to the national gross domestic product (GDP) is relatively low. While agriculture accounted for around 50 percent of the GDP in 1980, this contribution decreased to less than 10 percent by 2013. In contrast, remittances accounted for 18.2 percent of the GDP in 2011. The 2009 Agriculture Census found that 15 786 of the 23 164 households surveyed were agriculturally active. However, only half of these agriculturally active households derived some income from their produce, with the remainder of households producing purely for the purpose of consumption. In addition, an estimated 37 300 ha was being used for agriculture at the time of the census, representing 57 percent of the total agricultural land. More generally, 82 percent of agricultural production value is generated from crops. Only 24 percent of the value added to products, however, is achieved through commercial agriculture, with subsistence farming accounting for most of the value-added products in the sector. In Samoa, there are five crops that account for 76 percent of production value. These include taro, swamp taro, coconut, banana and pumpkin. Additionally, cabbage (15 percent) and tomato (3 percent) account for most of the remaining production value. Critically, shortcomings in the domestic production of high-value horticultural crops contributes to the high cost of both local and imported vegetables compared to substitute foods. This in turn, contributes to the Samoan population’s high dependence on purchasing imported foods, which is estimated to account for over 70 percent of their diets. As a result, there are high consumption rates of prepared and convenience foods that contain high levels of salt, sugar and saturated fat, which contribute to poor nutrition and obesity. Despite the existing challenges, the agriculture sector has been at the forefront of economic growth in Samoa and remains crucial to national food security, income generation and export potential. Therefore, the vision for the Agriculture Sector Plan 2011–2016 focused on “Agriculture for Food and Income Security” and was guided by the “farming and fishing first” theme. In particular, two of the key areas that have been explored are improved fruit tree development and value addition for selected crops.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Project
    Floating Garden Agricultural Practices in Bangladesh: A Proposal for Globally Important Agricultural Heritage Systems (GIAHS)
    Globally Important Agricultural Heritage Systems (GIAHS)
    2017
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    . Floating gardens are age-old practice of crop cultivation in the Southern floodplains of Bangladesh (Barisal, Goplaganj and Pirojpur districts). Floating garden agricultural practices (locally known as Dhap) for growing vegetables and spices prevail in the wetlands of the south central coastal districts of Bangladesh since immemorial times. With the use of available water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) and other aquatic weeds, local communities have developed a technique to construct reasona bly-sized floating platforms or raft on which vegetables and other crops can be cultivated. The unique hydroponics production system was developed in the hands of the locals by using their traditional knowledge for agricultural practice and livelihood. The production system is the major livelihood option for about 60-90% of the locals. Bio-diverse vegetables and spices crops are grown sustainably over the years on floating substrata made mainly of water hyacinth and other minor aquatic weeds on flooded water. The land with the water is used for production of fish in the open water and crops on the floating beds.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Project
    Technical Assistance for Enhanced Maize and Vegetable Production in Support of Smallholder Farmers - TCP/SWA/3707 2022
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    In Eswatini, food and nutrition security is increasingly threatened by climate change and persistent pre and post harvest crop losses Climate variability exposes smallholder farmers and poor, rural populations to droughts and inconsistent rain patterns This further puts food production, including of horticultural crops that are important off season sources of food and income for many farmers in the country, at risk Several institutional efforts have been made to address the situation, including the prioritization of improved maize productivity and the strengthening of horticulture production and marketing There is a further need to invest in technologies that can help adapt to the effects of climate change, such as tunnels for vegetable production These technologies can reduce pests, diseases and crop losses and improve productivity and youth participation in agriculture, leading to income generation for smallholder farmers and enhanced food and nutrition security.

Users also downloaded

Showing related downloaded files

No results found.