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Livelihood and micro-enterprise development opportunities for women in coastal fishing communities in India – Case studies of Orissa and Maharashtra.









Tietze, U., Siar, S., Upare, S. M. & Upare, M.A. 2007. Livelihood and micro-enterprise development opportunities for women in coastal fishing communities in India – Case studies of Orissa and Maharashtra. FAO Fisheries Circular. No. 1021. Rome, FAO. 69 p.


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    Book (series)
    Pilot project: Introduction of alternative income generating activities for livelihood diversification for fishing dependent communities on the Islands of the three riparian States of Lake Victoria
    GCP/RAF/466/EC SmartFish Project
    2013
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    The Lake Victoria Fisheries Organization, with support from the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, under the implementation of a regional strategy for the Eastern and Southern African - Indian Ocean region program, is implementing a pilot project: ‘The Introduction of Alternative Income Generating Activities for Livelihood Diversification for Fishing Dependent Communities on the Islands of the Three Riparian States of Lake Victoria’. A baseline survey on vulnerability/livel ihood/poverty in all project target areas/groups was undertaken in June 2013. The purpose was to establish vulnerability indicators and livelihood/dependency/poverty patterns associated with selected self-help groups located on selected islands of Lake Victoria in the riparian countries: Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda. The other objective was to identify potential alternative income generating activities that would reduce dependency on fishing and fish resources. The selected self-help groups and th eir respective beaches and islands are: Nyisiaya Women’s Group in Ndeda Beach, on Ndeda Island and USIA Youth Group in Mahanga, on Mageta Island (Kenya); Mpola Mpola at Gori, on Jagusi Island and Ddajje Star Group in Ddajje, on Buggala Island (Uganda); REEC/UPENDO in Ihumbo, on Bumbire Island and NEEMA Community Group in Igalula, on Ukerewe Island (Tanzania). The six self-help groups and respective fishing communities were interviewed by means of focus group discussions and personal interviews o n major areas of concern: group status; ownership of assets; access to services; vulnerability; income and expenditure; poverty and gender. The results show that the fisher communities are primarily concerned with, in order of priority: health; declining fish catches; safety on the lake; credit access, and education. The fishers acknowledge their high dependence on fish stating that during times of drought, market fluctuations and weather changes the communities are more vulnerable. They therefo re understand the need for diversification of income. The survey findings show that most self-help groups were formed to augment income, food and access to credit. The majority of the members of the self-help groups have access to land; semi-permanent housing; a few of their own livestock; two meals a day; no means of their own transport; no access to electricity; inadequate access to safe water; low savings; and little or no education. The study shows that food and education are the main expend iture items and there is little money available for diversification into non-fishery income generating activities. The different alternative income generating activities (IGAs) were proposed to supplement income, diversify sources of income and provide food. The IGAs include: crop farming, identified for food security and supplementary income for group members’ households; poultry farming for eggs and meat to generate income; cattle rearing for milk and meat to generate income and supplement die t; fish farming to diversify, generate income and reduce fishing pressure on Lake Victoria.  4 The next steps are to support the target groups technically and financially so that they can undertake the proposed IGAs to meet their respective goals. In line with the objectives of the project, the following activities will be undertaken:  Organize and facilitate a one-day validation meeting for at least 20 relevant stakeholders to present the results of the assessment and proposed work plans an d interventions at the premises of the Lake Victoria Fisheries Organization;  Capacity building of micro-project stakeholders and beneficiaries to sustain the initiative (business, marketing, management of micro-enterprises);  Carry out the livelihood diversification activities according to the work plans and detailed budget agreed;  Disseminate the preliminary results of the livelihood diversification activities through different media at the national level;  Organize and facilitate a final meeting at the national level for at least 20 relevant stakeholders to present the results of the poverty reduction activities and the proposed upscale/replication of interventions.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Attempts to Stimulate Development Activities in Fishing Communities of Adirampattinam, India - BOBP/REP/25 1986
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    This paper discusses the rationale, modus operandi, conduct and outcome of a pilot project to help the development of coastal fishing communities near Adirampattinam, Tamil Nadu, India. Two earlier papers on the project published by the BOBP are BOBP/WP/19 : “Coastal village development in four fishing communities of Adirampattinam, Tamil Nadu, India” and BOBP/WP/38: “Credit for fisherfolk: the experience in Adirampattinam, Tamil Nadu, India”. The project was carried out between 1980 and 1982 by the small-scale fisheries project of the Bay of Bengal Programme (BOBP) in cooperation with the fisheries department, Tamil Nadu, particularly its Fisherwomen’s Extension Service; and with the assistance of voluntary agencies such as the Working Women’s Forum. In the main, the project tried to improve the access of fishermen and fisherwomen to bank loans and Government credit schemes; and organized leadership training courses to promote leadership and group action. Some follow-up activities - relating, for example, to non-formal adult education and better water supply - were initiated after,the latter. The idea was to stimulate self-help and self reliance in Adirampattinam fishing communities, without any substantial external inputs.
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    Book (series)
    Report of the National Workshop on Micro-enterprise Development in Coastal Communities in the Philippines: Sharing of Experiences and Lessons Learned. Davao City, Philippines, 7-11 March 2006 2007
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    The goals of the National Workshop on Micro-enterprise Development in Coastal Communities in the Philippines were to exchange experiences and good practices and identify financial and institutional support services and facilities to sustain livelihoods and micro-enterprises in coastal areas. The discussions at the workshop showed that livelihoods diversification and the improvement of income and employment opportunities in coastal fishing communities are crucial for their participation in the co nservation and management of aquatic resources. Key elements of sustainable micro-enterprise development as identified by the workshop include capability building of fisherfolk organizations such as cooperatives and associations to implement livelihood projects, the preparation of feasibility studies and business plans, technical skills development, sound financial management practices, development of innovative and high quality products, access to new markets including urban and regional market s and the full participation of fisherfolk in the identification of livelihood activities and micro-entrerprises.

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