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Global Forest Resources Assessment 2010 - Main report











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    Book (stand-alone)
    التقييم العالمي لحالة الموارد الحرجية لعام 2010 2010
    The Global Forest Resources Assessment 2010 (FRA 2010) is the most comprehensive assessment of the world’s forests ever. It covers 233 countries and areas for the period 1990 to 2010. This publication, the main report of FRA 2010, contains country data, contributed by national correspondents and reviewed and collated by FAO, for more than 90 key variables related to the extent, condition, uses and values of forests. Seven core chapters evaluate the status and trends for key aspects of sustainabl e forest management: extent of forest resources; forest biological diversity; forest health and vitality; productive functions of forest resources; protective functions of forest resources; socio-economic functions of forests; and the legal, policy and institutional framework guiding the conservation, management and use of the world’s forests. Based on these results, the report analyses progress being made towards sustainable forest management over the past 20 years, with a series of “traffic li ghts” indicating where there is cause for optimism and where there is cause for alarm. This report is an essential reference for anyone interested in the status of the world’s forests and will support policies, decisions and negotiations in all matters where forests and forestry play a part.
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    Project
    Technical Support for National Forest Inventory - TCP/TON/3702 2022
    Also available in:
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    Tonga has 13 112 ha of forested land consisting principally of forests 7 945 ha), other wooded land 2 400 ha), forest plantations 1 000 ha), mangrove and saline wetlands 1 767 ha) Tonga’s trees and forests play a significant role in supporting sustainable livelihoods and protecting the country’s fragile environments against the impacts of climate change and natural disasters Plants and tree products gathered from the various forest ecosystems provide food, building material, oils and ornaments that are highly valued in Tongan tradition and culture Currently, Tonga lacks official and nationally verified baseline data and technical information on the country’s tree and forest resources The data that exist were collected some time ago and are mostly outdated in addition, most were collected using different methodologies on an ad hoc basis and, as such, cannot be compared with each other or utilized freely with other data sets There is also a lack of information on the extent and rate of recent deforestation This is most pronounced on the main island of Tongatapu where some estimates indicate that the remaining forest area is less than 5 percent of the total land area The main cause of this problem is the lack of technical capacity and resources within the government to carry out a national forest inventory ( and to conduct a regular assessment, monitoring and reporting of the country’s tree and forest resources).
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    Forest policies, legislation and institutions in Asia and the Pacific: Trends and emerging needs for 2020 2010
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Over the past decade the Asia-Pacific region has experienced tremendous changes in nearly every aspect. These changes have been particularly profound in the forestry sector, where society has dramatically increased its demands and expanded its expectations for goods and services. Almost all countries in the region have moved towards sustainable forest management at the policy level and in many countries institutional structures are also gradually changing. This report reviews the status and tren ds in forestry policy, legislation and institutions in 12 countries and outlines the extent to which changes in these areas have been effective in supporting transitions towards sustainable forest management. Trends in governance and efforts to tackle illegal logging are also assessed. The report highlights the need to develop consensus over the roles of forestry in national development as a fundamental pre-condition for improving forest management. Policy measures should promote economic growth balanced with resource conservation and poverty reduction. This involves clear and equitable allocation of rights and responsibilities, application of appropriate technology and environmental safeguards, and removal of disincentives for investment in forestry. Most of all, forestry institutions need to be flexible and responsive in capturing opportunities and striving to optimize the contribution of the forestry sector to emerging needs.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    التقييم العالمي لحالة الموارد الحرجية لعام 2010 2010
    The Global Forest Resources Assessment 2010 (FRA 2010) is the most comprehensive assessment of the world’s forests ever. It covers 233 countries and areas for the period 1990 to 2010. This publication, the main report of FRA 2010, contains country data, contributed by national correspondents and reviewed and collated by FAO, for more than 90 key variables related to the extent, condition, uses and values of forests. Seven core chapters evaluate the status and trends for key aspects of sustainabl e forest management: extent of forest resources; forest biological diversity; forest health and vitality; productive functions of forest resources; protective functions of forest resources; socio-economic functions of forests; and the legal, policy and institutional framework guiding the conservation, management and use of the world’s forests. Based on these results, the report analyses progress being made towards sustainable forest management over the past 20 years, with a series of “traffic li ghts” indicating where there is cause for optimism and where there is cause for alarm. This report is an essential reference for anyone interested in the status of the world’s forests and will support policies, decisions and negotiations in all matters where forests and forestry play a part.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Project
    Technical Support for National Forest Inventory - TCP/TON/3702 2022
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Tonga has 13 112 ha of forested land consisting principally of forests 7 945 ha), other wooded land 2 400 ha), forest plantations 1 000 ha), mangrove and saline wetlands 1 767 ha) Tonga’s trees and forests play a significant role in supporting sustainable livelihoods and protecting the country’s fragile environments against the impacts of climate change and natural disasters Plants and tree products gathered from the various forest ecosystems provide food, building material, oils and ornaments that are highly valued in Tongan tradition and culture Currently, Tonga lacks official and nationally verified baseline data and technical information on the country’s tree and forest resources The data that exist were collected some time ago and are mostly outdated in addition, most were collected using different methodologies on an ad hoc basis and, as such, cannot be compared with each other or utilized freely with other data sets There is also a lack of information on the extent and rate of recent deforestation This is most pronounced on the main island of Tongatapu where some estimates indicate that the remaining forest area is less than 5 percent of the total land area The main cause of this problem is the lack of technical capacity and resources within the government to carry out a national forest inventory ( and to conduct a regular assessment, monitoring and reporting of the country’s tree and forest resources).
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    Forest policies, legislation and institutions in Asia and the Pacific: Trends and emerging needs for 2020 2010
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Over the past decade the Asia-Pacific region has experienced tremendous changes in nearly every aspect. These changes have been particularly profound in the forestry sector, where society has dramatically increased its demands and expanded its expectations for goods and services. Almost all countries in the region have moved towards sustainable forest management at the policy level and in many countries institutional structures are also gradually changing. This report reviews the status and tren ds in forestry policy, legislation and institutions in 12 countries and outlines the extent to which changes in these areas have been effective in supporting transitions towards sustainable forest management. Trends in governance and efforts to tackle illegal logging are also assessed. The report highlights the need to develop consensus over the roles of forestry in national development as a fundamental pre-condition for improving forest management. Policy measures should promote economic growth balanced with resource conservation and poverty reduction. This involves clear and equitable allocation of rights and responsibilities, application of appropriate technology and environmental safeguards, and removal of disincentives for investment in forestry. Most of all, forestry institutions need to be flexible and responsive in capturing opportunities and striving to optimize the contribution of the forestry sector to emerging needs.

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