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Diet, Nutrition and the Prevention of Chronic Diseases

Report of a Joint WHO/FAO Expert Consultation









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    Document
    Food, Nutrition and Agriculture 2001
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    In many parts of the world, people are changing their lifestyles as, moving to urban areas, they adopt new diets and more sedentary behaviour patterns. Because energy intakes exceed energy expenditures, for some people obesity is becoming more common. Obesity is associated with serious chronic diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease and some forms of cancer. For poor communities and countries, the prevalence of both obesity and undernutrition within the same population can make improvi ng nutrition and health even more complex. In this issue of Food, Nutrition and Agriculture, two articles discuss the relationships between social and economic change and obesity. Preventing obesity and other nutritional problems requires mass education. A third article describes strategies that nutritionists in developing countries use for developing food-based dietary guidelines.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Globalization of food systems in developing countries: impact on food security and nutrition 2005
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    Food systems are being transformed at an unprecedented rate as a result of global economic and social change. Urbanization, foreign direct investment in markets of developing countries and increasing incomes are prime facilitators for the observed changes, while social changes, such as the increased number of women in the workforce and rural to urban migration, provide added stimulus. Changes are also facilitated in concrete ways by food production based on intensive agriculture, new food proces sing and storage technologies, longer product shelf-life, the emergence of food retailers such as fast food outlets and supermarkets and the intensification of advertising and marketing of certain products. The sum of these changes has resulted in diverse foods that are available all year for those who can afford them, as well as a shift in home-prepared and home-based meals to pre-prepared or ready-to-eat meals, often consumed away from home. These food system and lifestyle changes are in turn having an impact on the health and nutritional status of people in developing countries. There is an indication of rapid increases in overweight and obesity, particularly among adults, and an increasing prevalence of diet-related non-communicable diseases. At the same time, social inequalities are increasing, particularly in urban areas. The papers appearing in this publication were first presented at the workshop "Globalization of food systems: impacts on food security and nutrition" held at FA O headquarters in Rome from 8 to 10 October 2003 . The chapters are arranged in two parts. The first contains overview chapters providing a synthesis of findings from 11 country case studies, an overview of issues related to urban food insecurity, a review of nutritional change in developing countries and some policy options to address these changes.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Developing Food-basedDietary Guidelines
    A Manual from the English-speaking Caribbean
    2007
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    Food-based dietary guidelines (FBDGs) provide practical advice about ways to improve diets and health in a manner that is easy for the public to understand. This manual explains a 10-step process for developing FBDGs that can be used in most countries. By following this process, nutritionists and others can create FBDGs that are well-adapted to national needs and based on nutrition science and communication expertise. A multidisciplinary approach enables governments to assess the country’s nutrition problems and to set realistic priorities for improving diets. Technical recommendations are transformed into simple messages the average person can follow. Nutritionists learn to develop strategies for communicating dietary information to the public. This manual is based on the experiences of four Caribbean countries in developing national FBDGs to promote healthy diets and to prevent obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular diseases.

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