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Developing a Progressive Control Pathway for African Animal Trypanosomosis









Oumar Diall, Giuliano Cecchi, Gift Wanda, Rafael Argilés-Herrero, Marc J.B. Vreysen, Giovanni Cattoli, Gerrit J. Viljoen, Raffaele Mattioli, Jérémy Bouyer (2017) Developing a Progressive Control Pathway for African Animal Trypanosomosis. Trends in Parasitology. 33:499−509. doi.org/10.1016/j.pt.2017.02.005



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    A staged, progressive control pathway for tsetse-transmitted African animal trypanosomosis 2017
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    Progressive Control Pathways (PCPs) are stepwise approaches for the reduction, elimination and eradication of human and animal diseases. They provide systematic frameworks for planning and evaluating interventions. Here we outline a PCP for tsetse-transmitted animal trypanosomosis, the scourge of poor livestock keepers in tropical Africa. Initial PCP stages focus on the establishment of national coordination structures, engagement of stakeholders, development of technical capacities, data collec tion and management, and pilot field interventions. The intermediate stage aims at a sustainable and economically profitable reduction of disease burden, while higher stages target elimination. The mixed-record of success and failure in past efforts against AAT makes the development of this PCP a high priority.
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    The COMBAT project: controlling and progressively minimizing the burden of vector-borne animal trypanosomosis in Africa
    Version 2 (15 August 2022)
    2022
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    Vector-borne diseases affecting livestock have serious impacts in Africa. Trypanosomosis is caused by parasites transmitted by tsetse flies and other blood-sucking Diptera. The animal form of the disease is a scourge for African livestock keepers, is already present in Latin America and Asia, and has the potential to spread further. A human form of the disease also exists, known as human African trypanosomosis or sleeping sickness. Controlling and progressively minimizing the burden of animal trypanosomosis (COMBAT) is a fouryear research and innovation project funded by the European Commission, whose ultimate goal is to reduce the burden of animal trypanosomosis (AT) in Africa. The project builds on the progressive control pathway (PCP), a risk-based, step-wise approach to disease reduction or elimination. COMBAT will strengthen AT control and prevention by improving basic knowledge of AT, developing innovative control tools, reinforcing surveillance, rationalizing control strategies, building capacity, and raising awareness. Knowledge gaps on disease epidemiology, vector ecology and competence, and biological aspects of trypanotolerant livestock will be addressed. Environmentally friendly vector control technologies and more effective and adapted diagnostic tools will be developed. Surveillance will be enhanced by developing information systems, strengthening reporting, and mapping and modelling disease risk in Africa and beyond. The socio-economic burden of AT will be assessed at a range of geographical scales. Guidelines for the PCP and harmonized national control strategies and roadmaps will be developed. Gender equality and ethics will be pivotal in all project activities. The COMBAT project benefits from the expertise of African and European research institutions, national veterinary authorities, and international organizations. The project consortium comprises 21 participants, including a geographically balanced representation from 13 African countries, and it will engage a larger number of AT-affected countries through regional initiatives.
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    African Trypanosomosis Control - Tackling neglected tropical diseases for African development 2019
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    Tsetse-transmitted trypanosomosis, a deadly, neglected tropical disease, is a major challenge for mixed livestock–crop agriculture in more than 10 million km2 of the most productive land in sub-Saharan Africa. The disease also threatens the lives of over 57 million people, particularly the poorest in rural areas. The direct and indirect losses caused by African animal trypanosomosis (AAT) are estimated at billions of dollars every year. To address the challenges posed by AAT, FAO, in collaboration with the key international and national stakeholders, is promoting the Progressive Control Pathway (PCP) for AAT. The PCP provides affected countries with an innovative strategic framework for planning, implementing and monitoring cost-effective field interventions. The overall objective of the PCP is to improve food security and decrease poverty by reducing and, where feasible, eliminating, the burden of AAT. Progress in AAT control will also contribute to ongoing efforts to eliminate human African trypanosomosis (sleeping sickness) through the One Health framework.

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