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Resilience building in Zimbabwe

FAO programme review 2024









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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Resilience building in Somalia
    FAO Programme Review 2024
    2024
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    Leveraging on more than a decade of delivering humanitarian response, saving lives, and building resilient and sustainable livelihoods in Somalia, FAO continues to prioritize strengthening the productive sectors and resilient food systems. At the core of this is building resilience against climate change and human-induced crises as well as protecting the poor and vulnerable from shocks and stresses. In Somalia, FAO operates one of the largest resilience programmes in sub-Saharan Africa in efforts to contribute to the regional, sub-regional and country priorities. FAO defines Resilience as the ability of individuals, households, and communities to PREVENT, ANTICIPATE, ABSORB, ADOPT and TRANSFORM positively, efficiently, and effectively when faced with a wide range of risks and crises while maintaining an acceptable level of functioning without compromising long-term prospects for sustainable development, peace and security, human rights, and well-being for all. The ongoing programme in Somalia implemented in collaboration with the government of Somalia and partners focuses on enhancing evidence-based policies and institutional interventions, covering components such as food security, nutrition, land, agriculture, aquaculture, livestock breeding, infrastructure rehabilitation/construction and seed policies and production. Through the programme, FAO supports increased production and productivity through targeted support to households, smallholder farmers, farmer organizations and cooperatives, youth and women organizations improved efficiency; provision/improvement of infrastructure such as feeder roads, markets, flood embarkments, fish landing sites, veterinary and seed laboratories; improving farmer knowledge and skills; investing in early warning and early action systems for evidence-based decision making and anticipatory actions; and strengthening of stakeholder coordination for higher and lasting impact of interventions. To improve agri-food system resilience, FAO has focused on supporting increased crop production to meet the cereal needs of the most vulnerable. To strengthen the preventive and anticipative resilience of the communities and the government, emphasis is made on strengthening the capacity of federal and state governments to conduct desert locust surveillance and control in order to prevent the destruction of crops. Support is provided to the livestock sector through animal treatment and vaccination campaigns, including efforts to commercialize the sector and reduce livestock-related conflicts. Moving towards adaptive and transformative capacity for longer term and sustainable resilience building, the focus is made towards strengthening irrigation potential in the riverine areas while providing cash to enable quick recovery. The FAO Somalia programme is also promoting the development of the fisheries sector which has a great potential to contribute to national food security. FAO interventions towards building resilience.
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    Document
    Plan of Action for North Sudan. Emergency response and rehabilitation for food and agriculture August 2010 – August 2012 2010
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    After decades of civil conflict and associated political instability, populations throughout North Sudan have seen their livelihoods and production capacity eroded and their ability to cope with human-induced and recurrent natural disasters (floods, droughts, outbreaks of livestock diseases) worn away. There have been considerable efforts to respond to the protracted crisis, with the international humanitarian response reaching USD 1.3 billion in 2009. Despite this, millions of people continue t o face severe and chronic food insecurity. With between 60 and 80 percent of the working-age population relying on agriculture to meet their food and income needs, the sector’s importance to economic recovery and the consolidation of peace in North Sudan cannot be underestimated. In this Plan of Action (PoA), the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) outlines its emergency and rehabilitation programme for North Sudan in 2010–12. It does not include FAO’s long-term develop ment programme, but is designed to complement the Organization’s ongoing development activities, as well as the interventions of United Nations agencies, Government and other partners which aim to mitigate the effects of recurrent crises while addressing their root causes. The programme relies heavily on a disaster risk management approach to the complex situation in North Sudan. This approach focuses on emergency relief, such as replacing lost assets or restoring livelihoods, as well as on earl y efforts as part of risk reduction that protect and sustain livelihoods. Such interventions can often be more effective than those delayed until people are in crisis. Given the complex and protracted nature of the crisis in North Sudan, FAO’s relief and recovery programming is enhanced by interventions that not only restore, but also protect and promote livelihoods in food and agriculture. Thus, the overall purpose of the PoA for North Sudan is to improve preparedness and to make short-term res ponses in food and agriculture more effective. The proposed priorities in this PoA will help FAO, its counterparts and partners to meet shortterm needs in ways that strengthen the resilience of communities and lead to more effective and longer-term recovery. The approach is reflected in the six key areas of focus as proposed in this PoA, based on an analysis of the current situation, the main factors triggering food insecurity and assessments identifying and targeting vulnerable groups. These ar e: (i) dwindling agricultural production; (ii) reduced livestock production and productivity; (iii) the adverse effect of climate change and the conflicts created over the use of scarce natural resources and longer-term issues such as land access; (iv) economic factors that affect the livelihoods of the various groups, as well as the creation of alternative livelihood resources; (v) the need for institutional strengthening; and (vi) coordination of the international community and the assistance provided. The above priorities have been expanded into twelve sectoral programmes that detail activities to be implemented by FAO in North Sudan to achieve expected outcomes and address the specific needs identified in three regions: (i) Greater Darfur (comprising North, South and West Darfur); (ii) the Transitional Areas (Abyei, Blue Nile and Southern Kordofan); and (iii) Eastern Sudan (Gedaref, Kassala and Red Sea states). The total budget for the PoA 2010–2012 is USD 45 056 468. The PoA signa ls FAO’s adoption of a more programmatic approach in its emergency and rehabilitation activities in North Sudan. The document has used a programme cycle management approach to present the situation analysis, planned response and monitoring and evaluation framework. Through this PoA and other efforts, FAO is attempting to build greater programmatic coherence with internal and external partners, in line with national food security plans and related strategy and United Nations system programming fr amework. Fundamentally, this PoA is a dynamic programming tool that may need to be adjusted, according to contingency plans, when and as the food security situation evolves in North Sudan.
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    Book (series)
    Evaluation of FAO’s country programme in Sierra Leone 2012–2019 2021
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    The agriculture sector in Sierra Leone accounts for 60 percent of GDP and 58 percent of total employment. More than 58 percent of the country’s population live in rural areas and 86.1 percent of this population are engaged in smallholder subsistence agricultural production. Ten years of civil conflict and the Ebola epidemic in 2014 negatively affected food security and the country’s overall socio-economic situation. The country is particularly vulnerable to extreme events such as food chain crises and natural hazards which have a direct impact on food security and livelihoods. This evaluation aims to identify lessons learned and provide strategic recommendations on how FAO programmes can be better oriented in Sierra Leone. FAO’s overall contribution to developmental challenges was assessed in the priority areas defined in the CPFs covering 2012–16 and 2017–19. The evaluation comprised an examination of associated outcome areas related to support to smallholder commercialization, natural resources management, and effective response to disasters and increasing social productivity and resilience. The review also evaluated crosscutting issues, including gender equality and women’s empowerment, climate resilience, nutrition, capacity development and youth employment. The evaluation used different methods to collect the views of the beneficiaries and other stakeholders, such as structured focus group discussions, structured key informant interviews, direct observation, and workshops. The fieldwork took place with actors from projects across five districts: Bo, Bombali, Kenema, Kono, and Port Loko. The evaluation found evidence of significant and sustainable results in a range of areas of FAO’s activities, including policy-related work, from adoption of legislation to policy influence, piloting of approaches, and standards and regulatory frameworks. Likewise, results leading to livelihoods improvements, empowerment and adoption of more sustainable organizational practices, technologies and skills were found. Nevertheless, the programme failed to aggregate activities and interventions in a programmatic and coherent portfolio. FAOs capacity to deliver sustainable and consistent results, with strong partnerships and complementary action, was often undermined by lack of, or weak systems and functions. FAO should use the development of the new CPF as a way to re-design its strategic footprint in the country and reach its full potential, despite the limiting factors. To do this, FAO could consider adopting an area-based approach, implementing a programmatic, multi-stakeholder and cross sectoral adaptive approach based on regions/districts.

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