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Avocado production in Asia and the Pacific

This publication brings together edited manuscripts of papers presented at the Expert Consultation on “Avocado Production Development in Asia and the Pacific”, held in Bangkok, Thailand, 27-29 April, 1999.









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    Book (series)
    Taro cultivation in Asia and the Pacific 1999
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    Taro, Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott occupies a significant place in the agriculture of the Asia-Pacific Region. It is in this region, more than any other in the world, that the crop attains its greatest importance as a staple food. In Oceania particularly, taro plays a critical role in the household, community, and national food security. Since both corms and leaves are usually consumed, taro supplies much-needed protein, vitamins, and minerals, in addition to carbohydrate energy. The socio-cultural importance of taro in the region is very high. The crop has evolved to be an integral part of the culture and features prominently in festivals, social gift-giving, and the discharge of social obligations. More recently, taro has become a source of income for individuals, and an earner of foreign exchange. Its role in rural development has therefore been increasing, especially with respect to the provision of employment and the alleviation of rural poverty. Given the importance of taro, activities need to be geared toward its research, development, and available literature. This book is, therefore, a valuable and timely effort to fill some of the information gaps with respect to taro in the Asia-Pacific Region. Apart from a general coverage of the region, it delves into a country-by-country treatment of taro cultivation in 19 of the most important taro-growing countries in the region. The publication will be a useful reference source for researchers, extension workers, growers, and entrepreneurs who are interested in taro. The presentation has placed emphasis on clarity and simplicity to permit easy understanding even by persons for whom English is a second language.
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    The lychee crop in Asia and the Pacific 2002
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    This publication provides a comprehensive account of the origin, distribution, production and trade of different species of the commercially important fruit crop that is mainly cultivated in Bangladesh, China, India, Nepal, Thailand and Viet Nam. These countries produce more than 1.8 million tonnes of the about 2 million tonnes of lychee crop cultivated annually in Asia, which accounts for over 95 percent of the world lychee harvest. Prepared by Christopher Menzel of the Maroochy Research Statio n, Queensland Department of Primary Industries, Australia, the document follows up on an expert consultation on lychee production in the Asia-Pacific region, which was organized by the FAO regional office in May 2001. It offers a detailed description of the botany and taxonomy of the plant, as well as its cultivation in different areas. Separate sections offer practical advice on orchard management, tackling pests and diseases, harvesting and storage, and review the prospects for the expansion o f Asia’s lychee industry.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Lychee production in the Asia-Pacific region 2002
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    A compilation of the country papers presented at and the conclusions/recommendations of the May 2001 expert consultation on lychee production in the Asia-Pacific region held in Bangkok, Thailand. First cultivated in China over 2 000 years ago, the fruit is now grown in a number of countries with subtropical climates, being most important for Bangladesh, China, India, Nepal, Thailand and Viet Nam. The Asia-Pacific region accounts for more than 95 percent of the global lychee production of over 2 million tonnes. Smallholders with less than 100 trees each are the main producers and the crop is mostly sold fresh, though a third of the lychee harvest in China is dried. The country papers review production, management and marketing of the crop as well as constraints to development. Low productivity, with average yields below 5 tonnes per hectare – compared to 15 tonnes achieved in Israel and some other nations – and short shelf-life are issues needing priority attention to enable smallholder s to gain the most from the high value crop.

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