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Lao Climate Service for Agriculture (LaCSA)









​FAO. 2020. Lao Climate Service for Agriculture (LaCSA). Vientiane.


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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Weather dependent climate smart recommendations
    Part of the Lao People's Democratic Republic climate services for agriculture (LaCSA)
    2021
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    The Laos Climate Services in Agriculture (LaCSA) system was developed by the Department of Meteorology and Hydrology (DMH) project Strengthening Agro-climatic Monitoring and Information System (SAMIS). The LaCSA archives and processes agro-meteorological and climatological data to provide agro-advisory services to next- and end-users. It generates and delivers tailored agro-met services to farmers by analyzing the meteorological data, agriculture data from national databases, and field level data collected by partners to produce seasonal (monthly) and real-time (weekly) agro-advisory in the form of bulletins. The bulletins contain district- and province-specific crop and livestock forecasted climate risks, pest and diseases risk advisory, and climate smart farming recommendations. The production of the recommendations was undertaken by the National Agriculture and Forestry Research Institute (NAFRI) and by the CIAT project DeRISK. Jointly these entities collected and systematized detailed agricultural data and experts knowledge throughout the country. The recommendations went through a series of revisions and validations based on feedback from local crop experts. The agricultural recommendations (presented here in English but available in Lao language too) are structured in tables. Rows list the farming activity, and columns contain farming practices by rainfall forecast compared to the climatological average, for which three conditions are possible: normal, wetter than normal, and drier than normal. This leaflet aims to promote fair access and transparency for researchers, development partners, and advisory users. LaCSA is a dynamic system and information can be updated and modified based on new knowledge and need. Authorized representatives will improve the recommendations over time.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Handbook on climate information for farming communities – What farmers need and what is available 2019
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    The content of this guide is twofold: to describe the most important weather and agroclimatic products that are available by the National Meteorological Service (NMS) and to identify the most important needs of farmers concerning climate information. Special consideration will be given to the local knowledge used by rural farmers, too often neglected, but a key factor to their ability to cope with climate variability and change. An additional objective of this guide is to improve communication among the NMS staff, in particular, meteorologists and agrometeorologists and to encourage Agro-Pastoral Field School (APFS) trainers and facilitators to be more aware of their respective availability. Furthermore, one of the most important aims is the exchange of agroclimatic information that corresponds to the needs of all concerned, thus facilitating the assessment of the existing climatic risks in farming activities. The integration of the Response Farming in Rainfed Agriculture (RF) approach into Farmer Field School (FFS) is feasibly an effective way to reconcile NMS products with the needs of farmers. RF is a method used for identifying and quantifying rainfall variability at a local level to assess the climatic risks of farming communities. The Climate-Responsive Farming Management (CRFM) approach is an enhanced version of RF that uses modern and digital technologies, such as specific computer software, automatic weather stations, real-time telecommunication and smartphone applications. This approach can be implemented at a minimum cost at the farming level.The integration of the Response Farming in Rainfed Agriculture (RF) approach into FFS is feasibly an effective way to reconcile NMS products with the needs of farmers. RF is a method used for identifying and quantifying rainfall variability at a local level to assess the climatic risks of farming communities. The Climate-Responsive Farming Management (CRFM) approach is an enhanced version of RF that uses modern and digital technologies, such as specific computer software, automatic weather stations, real-time telecommunication and smartphone applications. This approach can be implemented at a minimum cost at the farming level.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Delivery of climate services to last mile users: challenges and opportunities for scaling 2022
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    This book describes the challenges and opportunities for scaling up delivery of climate services to last mile users and describes the baseline assessment results of the project “Strengthening Agro-climatic Monitoring and Information Systems (SAMIS) to improve adaptation to climate change and food security in Lao PDR”. After a methodological introduction, the book describes how households were accessing weather news. Further to this, the use of loudspeakers as a source of weather information is described, including use of weather news from loudspeakers, use of weather information, challenges to use of advisories, suggestions for improving advisories, sources of support for farmers, and type of support provided to farmers. The book also studies the farmers who did not access advisories, including their challenges in accessing advisories from loudspeakers, preferred channels for receiving advisories, and interests in loudspeaker-delivered advisories from farmers who have not accessed advisories. Finally, the book analyse suggestions for improving dissemination through loudspeakers. The results show that loudspeakers have a wide reach and are valued by farmers, and it is used when choosing crop variety. Those who have access to both farmer field schools and loudspeakers are more likely to adjust their planting schedule, while farmers who get their information only from loudspeakers often change their water management practices.

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