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Global Programme for the prevention and control of H5N1 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza - February 2008








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    REPORT - GLOBAL PROGRAMME FOR THE PREVENTION AND CONTROL OF HIGHLY PATHOGENIC AVIAN INFLUENZA 2008
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    Following the outbreak and spread of the H5N1 virus strain of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) in Southeast Asia in late 2003-early 2004, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE), in close collaboration with the World Health Organization (WHO), developed the FAO/OIE Global Strategy for the Prevention and Control of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza. The strategy focused resources on fighting and eradicating HPAI in animals in order to avert spread of the virus to humans and an eventual human influenza pandemic. In order to meet its responsibilities under the Global Strategy, FAO developed a Global Programme for the Prevention and Control of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza. That programme, which is implemented by the Emergency Centre for Transboundary Animal Diseases (ECTAD) at FAO headquarters in Rome, emphasises the need for both global and regional coordination in order to help HPAI infected and at- risk countries develop effective prevention and control programmes. The Global Programme is regularly revised and updated to reflect the changing disease situation, to report how FAO expertise is being utilised to combat HPAI, and to report accurately on activities and budget monitoring.
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    The Global Strategy for Prevention and Control of H5N1 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza - October 2008 2008
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    The FAO-OIE Global Strategy for the Progressive Control of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) was first developed by FAO and OIE in collaboration with WHO in response to a recommendation from the FAO/OIE Regional Meeting on Avian Influenza Control in Asia (23-25 February 2005, Ho Chi Minh City, Viet Nam). The strategy prepared in November 2005 focused predominantly on control of the disease in East and Southeast Asia. Since then, the H5N1 HPAI situation has evolved dramatically.The disease has spread widely in Asia, Europe, the Near East and Africa, culminating in the current situation in which infection remains endemic in a number of countries in Asia and Africa and has infected birds (poultry and/or wild birds) in over 60 countries. The widespread nature of the disease, its mounting socio-economic impact, the increasing number of human infections and deaths and the potential threat of a human influenza pandemic continue to underline the need for a global approach to H5N 1 HPAI prevention and control. The revised Global Strategy presented here takes into account the global situation and progress in HPAI control and the accumulated experience and lessons learned from national, regional and global efforts to control the disease.
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    The Global Strategy for Prevention and Control of H5N1 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza 2007
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    Although there remain serious gaps in knowledge, there has been an increased understanding of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) since the panzootic started in late 2003, and experience with various control approaches has allowed refinement of strategies at the global, regional and national levels. The revised global strategy presented here is based on the experience and lessons learned from the involvement of FAO and OIE in the global control of H5N1 HPAI over the last three years. The re vised strategy provides long-term vision and goals, identifies priorities and strategy approaches, and proposes short-, medium- and long-term actions at national, regional and global levels to control and ultimately eradicate the disease. The strategy has been developed in collaboration with WHO and a number of experts from OIE/FAO reference laboratories.

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