FAO Knowledge Repository BETA

The FAO Knowledge Repository is FAO's official open repository, providing access to all of its publications. Through its open access policy, FAO seeks to increase the dissemination of its knowledge and to contribute to the scientific and technical impact of the Organization. 

 

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    Book (series)
    Respecting free, prior and informed consent
    Practical guidance for governments, companies, NGOs, indigenous peoples and local communities in relation to land acquisition
    2014
    Improving governance of tenure is the objective of the Voluntary Guidelines on the Responsible Governance of Tenure of Land, Fisheries and Forests in the Context of National Food Security (Guidelines), which serve as a reference and set out principles and internationally accepted standards for responsible practices. The Guidelines state that responsible investments should do no harm, safeguard against dispossession of legitimate tenure right holders and environmental damage, and should respect human rights. This technical guide on Respecting free, prior and informed consent (FPIC) sets out practical actions for government agencies to respect and protect FPIC and for civil society organizations, land users and private investors globally to comply with their responsibilities in relation to FPIC, as endorsed by the Guidelines.
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    Book (series)
    Compulsory acquisition of land and compensation 2008
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    Compulsory acquisition is the power of government to acquire private rights in land without the willing consent of the owner or occupant in order to benefit society and is often necessary for social and economic development and the protection of the natural environment. The exercise of these powers is frequently contentious and problematic. The guide explains what compulsory acquisition and compensation are, and what constitutes good practice in this area, examining the consequences of poor legi slation, procedures and implementation. It is likely to be of most use in countries that are seeking to understand good practice in this area and to improve their own legislation, procedures and implementation in compulsory purchase and compensation in the interests of society as a whole.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Free Prior and Informed Consent: An indigenous peoples’ right and a good practice for local communities 2016

    This Free, Prior and Informed Consent (FPIC) Manual is designed as a tool for project practitioners of a broad range of projects and programmes of any development organization, by providing information about the right to FPIC and how it can be implemented in six steps.

    In an FPIC process, the “how”, “when” and “with and by whom”, are as important as “what” is being proposed. For an FPIC process to be effective and result in consent or lack of it, the way in which the process is conducted is paramount. The time allocated for the discussions among the indigenous peoples, the cultural appropriateness of the way the information is conveyed, and the involvement of the whole community, including key groups like women, the elderly and the youth in the process, are all essential. A thorough and well carried FPIC process helps guarantee everyone’s right to self-determination, allowing them to participate in decisions that affect their lives.

    This FPIC Manual will ena ble field practitioners to incorporate FPIC into project and programmes’ design and implementation, ensuring that indigenous peoples’ rights are duly respected. FPIC can be considered the “gold standard” because it allows for the highest form of participation of local stakeholders in development projects.

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    Book (stand-alone)
    The future of food and agriculture: Trends and challenges 2017
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    What will be needed to realize the vision of a world free from hunger and malnutrition? After shedding light on the nature of the challenges that agriculture and food systems are facing now and throughout the 21st century, the study provides insights into what is at stake and what needs to be done. “Business as usual” is not an option. Major transformations in agricultural systems, rural economies, and natural resources management are necessary. The present study was undertaken for the quadrennial review of FAO’s strategic framework and for the preparation of the Organization Medium-Term plan 2018-2021.
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    Book (series)
    The State of Food Security and Nutrition in the World 2023
    Urbanization, agrifood systems transformation and healthy diets across the rural–urban continuum
    2023
    This report provides an update on global progress towards the targets of ending hunger (SDG Target 2.1) and all forms of malnutrition (SDG Target 2.2) and estimates on the number of people who are unable to afford a healthy diet. Since its 2017 edition, this report has repeatedly highlighted that the intensification and interaction of conflict, climate extremes and economic slowdowns and downturns, combined with highly unaffordable nutritious foods and growing inequality, are pushing us off track to meet the SDG 2 targets. However, other important megatrends must also be factored into the analysis to fully understand the challenges and opportunities for meeting the SDG 2 targets. One such megatrend, and the focus of this year’s report, is urbanization. New evidence shows that food purchases in some countries are no longer high only among urban households but also among rural households. Consumption of highly processed foods is also increasing in peri-urban and rural areas of some countries. These changes are affecting people’s food security and nutrition in ways that differ depending on where they live across the rural–urban continuum. This timely and relevant theme is aligned with the United Nations General Assembly-endorsed New Urban Agenda, and the report provides recommendations on the policies, investments and actions needed to address the challenges of agrifood systems transformation under urbanization and to enable opportunities for ensuring access to affordable healthy diets for everyone.

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    Book (stand-alone)
    A study of shark and ray non-fin commodities in Mexico 2024
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    The work presented here summarizes published research from Mexico, also linked to an FAO summary, plus studies from India, Indonesia and Peru. In collaboration with various country programmes and local research groups, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) examined shark and ray value chains. The goal was to provide valuable information for fisheries and environmental agencies, shedding light on the role of non-fin commodities derived from sharks and rays in fisheries and trade. To effectively conserve shark and ray resources, we must adopt a more holistic understanding of their fisheries and markets. Historically, the focus has primarily centred on regulating the export of shark fins, often overlooking traditional and emerging fishing practices (and markets) related to other elasmobranch products (such as meat, skin, cartilage, liver oil, and gill plates). Due to limited examination of non-fin commodities, we lack clarity on their sources, the extent of exploitation, and their significance as drivers of elasmobranch utilization. The report aims to shift attention towards non-fin commodities in shark and ray management. By doing so, we hope to expand the range of potential interventions that can be employed to achieve sustainable elasmobranch fisheries – a critical source of food security, nutrition, and livelihoods for coastal communities worldwide.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    A study of shark and ray non-fin commodities in India 2024
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    This report is the outcome of a study on shark and ray non-fin commodities in India, carried out by the Indian Council of Agricultural Research Central Marine Fisheries Research Institute (ICAR-CMFRI) for the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and funded by FAO. The study recognizes the role of shark non-fin commodities in nutrition, trade and livelihoods and seeks to enhance the understanding of shark product utilization in India, which will complement India’s national plan of action on sharks and support policy matters on sharks.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    A study of shark and ray non-fin commodities in Indonesia 2024
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    No results found.

    The work presented here summarizes published research from Indonesia, also linked to an FAO summary, plus studies from India, Indonesia and Peru. In collaboration with various country programmes and local research groups, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) examined shark and ray value chains. The goal was to provide valuable information for fisheries and environmental agencies, shedding light on the role of non-fin commodities derived from sharks and rays in fisheries and trade. To effectively conserve shark and ray resources, we must adopt a more holistic understanding of their fisheries and markets. Historically, the focus has primarily centred on regulating the export of shark fins, often overlooking traditional and emerging fishing practices (and markets) related to other elasmobranch products (such as meat, skin, cartilage, liver oil, and gill plates). Due to limited examination of non-fin commodities, we lack clarity on their sources, the extent of exploitation , and their significance as drivers of elasmobranch utilization. This report aims to shift attention towards non-fin commodities in shark and ray management. By doing so, we hope to expand the range of potential interventions that can be employed to achieve sustainable elasmobranch fisheries – a critical source of food security, nutrition, and livelihoods for coastal communities worldwide.
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    Booklet
    Pesticides use and trade, 1990–2021 2023
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    Pesticides are a key agricultural input needed to protect seeds and safeguard crops from unwanted plants, insects, bacteria, fungi and rodents. At the same time, pesticides can have negative health and environmental impacts through contamination of soil, water and non-target plants and animals, which can decrease biodiversity and harm living organisms including humans. Statistics of pesticides use and trade are relevant for monitoring the sustainability of agriculture. In particular, they can help assess the global movement of pesticides and identify possible shortcomings in access to markets. The FAOSTAT Pesticides Use database contains data on pesticides use by country, in active ingredients and by major pesticide category, currently for the period 1990-2021.
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    Book (series)
    The State of the World’s Forests 2022
    Forest pathways for green recovery and building inclusive, resilient and sustainable economies
    2022
    Against the backdrop of the Glasgow Leaders’ Declaration on Forests and Land Use and the pledge of 140 countries to eliminate forest loss by 2030 and to support restoration and sustainable forestry, the 2022 edition of The State of the World’s Forests (SOFO) explores the potential of three forest pathways for achieving green recovery and tackling multidimensional planetary crises, including climate change and biodiversity loss. The three interrelated pathways are halting deforestation and maintaining forests; restoring degraded lands and expanding agroforestry; and sustainably using forests and building green value chains. The balanced, simultaneous pursuit of these pathways can generate sustainable economic and social benefits for countries and their rural communities, help sustainably meet increasing global demand for materials, and address environmental challenges. The State of the World’s Forests 2022 presents evidence on the feasibility and value of these pathways and outlines initial steps that could be taken to further pursue them. There is no time to lose – action is needed now to keep the global temperature increase below 1.5 °C, reduce the risk of future pandemics, ensure food security and nutrition for all, eliminate poverty, conserve the planet’s biodiversity and offer young people hope of a better world and a better future for all.