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Climate Change and the Forestry Sector: Possible Legislative Responses for National and Subnational Governments









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    Unasylva 247/248 - XIV World Forestry Congress 2016
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    Forests are essential to life on our planet, to mitigating and adapting to climate change, ensuring adequate supply of fresh water, enhancing biodiversity and providing sustainable incomes and livelihoods, including food security. But they face unprecedented and unrelenting pressures. This issue includes a broad selection of the best papers submitted to the XIV World Forestry Congress (Durban, September 2015), as well as an overview of the Congress’s ambitious agenda and outcomes.
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    Using Marginal Abatement Cost Curves to Realize the Economic Appraisal of Climate Smart Agriculture Policy Options
    Analytical Tools. EASYPol Module116
    2012
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    The AFOLU sector (Agriculture, Forestry, Land Use) is directly linked with climate change issues, on an environmental aspect as well as on an economical and social aspect (food security). Yet, while there is a wide range of technical solutions, it is not immediately apparent which options deliver the most economically efficient reductions in GHG within agriculture. This is why methodologies such as a Marginal Abatement Cost Curves (MACC) have been developed over these past twenty years. MACC als o enables the comparison of the cost-effectiveness of mitigation options between different sectors (e.g. agriculture, power, transport, industry and domestic energy consumption). MACC has become a useful tool for policy makers to prioritize mitigation options. This paper aims at putting forward a methodology to use MAC-curves within the AFOLU sector. It especially targets policy planners and policy makers. The agricultural sector, also called agriculture or AFOLU, encompasses farm-based activiti es (crop production, livestock) as well as forestry and land use. It does not include the downstream agro-industry sector. The first part of these guidelines explains the methodology in order to assess the cost-effectiveness and the mitigation potential of technical practices in agriculture. It also underlines the limits of the MACC approach. The second part looks at a practical MACC analysis example, using the EX-ACT tool.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Agriculture, forestry and other land use emissions by sources and removals by sinks
    1990-2011 Analysis
    2014
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    This report discusses new knowledge on anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from agriculture, forestry and other land use (AFOLU) activities made available through the new FAOSTAT Emission database. The database is available globally, with country detail, for all agriculture, forestry and land sub-categories available in FAOSTAT and in the Forest Resources Assessment (FRA). GHG emissions are computed from official national activity data and geo-spatial analyses, applying international st andard methodologies of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) to ensure consistency with GHG Inventory processes established under the climate convention. The analysis shows increases in emissions of agriculture (from 4.6 to 5.0 Gt CO2 eq yr-1 in 1990s and 2000s; 5.3 Gt CO2 eq yr-1 in 2011), decreases in deforestation rates (from 4.6 to 3.8 Gt CO2 eq yr-1 in 1990s and 2000s; 3.7 Gt CO2 eq yr-1 in 2010), and decreases in forest sinks, albeit with a reversal since the mid-2000s (f rom -2,9 to -1.9 Gt CO2 eq yr-1 in 1990s and 2000s values; -2.1 Gt CO2 eq yr-1 in 2010). At the same time, the data show that GHG intensity of products (i.e., GHG emissions per unit commodity produced) decreased during 1990-2010, but that if no further mitigation measures and technical efficiency improvements are implemented, future emissions may further increase by up to 30% by 2050. Better information on AFOLU emissions is critical in many developing countries, given the potential to identif y and fund actions that can usefully bridge national food security, resilience, mitigation and development goals into one coherent package.

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