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Measuring and modelling soil carbon stocks and stock changes in livestock production systems – A scoping analysis for the LEAP work stream on soil carbon stock changes











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    Book (stand-alone)
    Measuring and modelling soil carbon stocks and stock changes in livestock production systems - Guidelines for assessment. Version 1 2019
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    These guidelines are a product of the Livestock Environmental Assessment and Performance (LEAP) Partnership, a multi-stakeholder initiative whose goal is to improve the environmental sustainability of the livestock supply chains through better methods, metrics and data. These guidelines provide a harmonized, international approach for estimating soil organic carbon (SOC) stock and stock changes in livestock production systems. The intended uses of this document are all those having an interest in quantifying soil carbon stocks or stock changes. Wide is the range of objectives and scales for SOC stock change studies, for example: Global or regional accounting for GHG emissions and removals from the land sector as a component of climate change accounting; Monitoring, reporting and verification obligations for the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change; Analysis of the climate change impact of livestock products; Evaluation of the environmental impacts of grazing land management for animal agriculture; Assessment of the mitigation potential of agricultural practices at an industry, region or farm scale; Implementing mitigation options in an emissions trading or other market mechanism where payments for SOC sequestration depend on accurate and verifiable quantification; Research into soil and biological processes affecting SOC stocks and dynamics. A set of methods and approaches are recommended for use by individual farmers or land managers, by those undertaking life cycle assessment of livestock products, policy makers, or regulators at local, regional or national scales.
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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Measuring and modelling soil carbon stocks and stock changes in livestock production systems
    Summary of the guidelines for assessment
    2019
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    Grazed livestock production systems are an integral part of the cultural, social and economic identity of many nations worldwide. Key agricultural commodities such as milk and meat come from ruminant (cud-chewing) animals, predominantly cows, goats and sheep. Soil properties, particular soil organic matter (SOM) content, may be affected directly when livestock graze on grassland; pastures and/or rangelands or indirectly when land is used for feed crop production. SOM content is measured as density of soil organic carbon (SOC). Indeed, there is a strong negative correlation between land use intensity and SOC. The focus of these guidelines is on measuring and modelling SOC stocks, as well as monitoring SOC changes in response to management practices in grasslands and rangelands. The methodology strives to increase understanding of carbon sequestration and to facilitate improvement of livestock systems’ environmental performance. A set of methods and approaches are recommended to be used by individual farmers, pastoralist, or land managers, or by those undertaking life cycle assessment studies, policy makers or regulators at local, regional or national scales.
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    Document
    Evaluation of carbon stocks of domestic wood products to improve carbon sinks in the forest sector
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Harvested Wood Products (HWP) is recognized as a carbon pool in the forest sector, along with biomass, dead wood, litter and soil. There was a debate about which country should include carbon stocks in imported or exported HWP. At the 17th Conference of the Parties in Durban (COP17) in 2011, domestic harvested wood products were accepted as accounted carbon pools and thus have to be reported by all Parties included in Annex I. Although the HWP carbon calculation method related to this has been suggested since the IPCC 2006 guidelines, it could not be calculated due to the lack of HWP statistics data in Korea.
    In this study, to estimate the carbon stock and the annual stock changes for each of the HWP categories. Input data on the production of wood products used in the model to estimate carbon emissions and removals from HWP in Korea were acquired from database of the 'Wood utilization survey report' and 'Statistical yearbook of Forestry' in Korea Forest Service. In particular, statistic data on production of sawnwood, wood-based panels and paper and paperboard were obtained for the period 1989–2019. It used the first order decay function with default half-lives of 35, 25 and two years, respectively. For the conversion of wood volume or weight into carbon the default conversion factors and half-lives provided by IPCC guideline. As a result of the calculation, it was estimated that about 0.7 million tCO2 was stored according to the use of domestic wood products in 2019. It is expected that it will be possible to quantify the carbon storage effect of HWP and to activate the use of wood products. Indeed, it could change if life expectancy of HWPs improves into the future. Furthermore, additional mitigation potential may be achieved when substituting emissions-intensive materials. Keywords: Sustainable forest management, Climate change, Value chain ID: 3619351

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