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The pollination services of forests

A review of forest and landscape interventions to enhance their cross-sectoral benefits












Krishnan, S., Wiederkehr Guerra, G., Bertrand, D., Wertz-Kanounnikoff, S. and Kettle, C.J. 2020. The pollination services of forests – A review of forest and landscape interventions to enhance their cross-sectoral benefits. Forestry Working Paper No. 15. Rome, FAO & Bioversity International.





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    The pollination services of forests
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    This infographic is based on a related publication to highlight the importance, at the forest and landscape scales, of employing pollination-friendly management practices. It provided a visually easy-to-retain overview of the publication, with recommendation on measures for maintaining pollinator in forests and landscapes. It aims at raising awareness among stakeholders about the benefits of pollinators and beneficial practices that help to enhance pollination services across agricultural sectors.
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    Pollinators are essential for orchard, horticultural and forage production, as well as the production of seed for many root and fibre crops. Pollinators such as bees, birds and bats affect 35 percent of the world’s crop production, increasing outputs of 87 of the leading food crops worldwide. Food security, food diversity, human nutrition and food prices all rely strongly on animal pollinators. The consequences of pollinator declines are likely to impact the production and costs of vitamin-rich crops like fruits and vegetables, leading to increasingly unbalanced diets and health problems. Maintaining and increasing yields in horticultural crops under agricultural development is critically important to health, nutrition, food security and better farm incomes for poor farmers. In the past, pollination has been provided by nature at no explicit cost to human communities. As farm fields have become larger, and the use of agricultural chemicals has increased, mounting evidence points to a p otentially serious decline in populations of pollinators under agricultural development.
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    Protection of honeybees and other pollinators: one global study 2021
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    Insect populations are declining globally. Most crops rely on insect pollination, putting 23 food security at risk. Honeybees are important pollinators and have been used widely in 24 public awareness campaigns. This study surveyed countries about the status of their 25 pollinators and programmes for monitoring and management. Responses were received 26 from 273 persons from 108 countries. Apis mellifera was reported by nearly all 27 countries. Many countries (72%) routinely collect honeybee data and populations are 28 stable or increasing (77% of countries). Other pollinators receive less attention, 29 although their populations are dwindling in most (70%) countries. Conservation and 30 protection are more commonly practiced for honeybees. Most threats, such as habitat 31 loss and pesticides, are shared by all pollinators. Therefore, conservation measures to 32 decrease these threats would be efficient, provided that competition among species is 33 avoided. Monitoring of pollinator populations should be increased.

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