Thumbnail Image

Potential brewing for Azerbaijani and Georgian tea industries










Prikhodko, D., Sterk, B., Monzini, J., Snell, J. 2021. Potential brewing for Azerbaijani and Georgian tea industries. Directions in investment, number  2. Rome, FAO.




Also available in:
No results found.

Related items

Showing items related by metadata.

  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (series)
    Tea sector review – Azerbaijan 2022
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    This study was produced under an FAO-EBRD Cooperation project on reviewing the development potential of the tea sectors of Azerbaijan and Georgia. As a result of the joint research in the two countries carried out as part of the project, a similar separate review of the Georgian tea sector was also published under the FAO Investment Centre's Knowledge for Investment (K4I) programme. Tea has a long tradition of cultivation in Azerbaijan and Georgia, dating back to the nineteenth century. The structural changes that followed the collapse of the Soviet Union in the early 1990s led to a dramatic decline of the two countries’ tea sectors. However, interest in tea production in Georgia and Azerbaijan has increased in recent years and, in an effort to revive their once thriving tea sectors, governments have adopted sector development programmes that provide for support to primary tea production. In spite of the long tradition and accumulated know-how of tea production and processing, there is little doubt that investments in both technology and knowledge will be required for the Azerbaijani and Georgian tea sectors to grow in a successful and sustainable way. Production focused on efficiency and quality and mindful of shifts in consumer preferences on global markets, but also of potential environmental risks, will be critical in achieving this goal. This publication is part of the Country Investment Highlights series under the FAO Investment Centre's Knowledge for Investment (K4I) programme.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (series)
    Tea sector review – Georgia 2022
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    This study was produced under an FAO-EBRD Cooperation project on reviewing the development potential of the tea sectors of Azerbaijan and Georgia. As a result of the joint research in the two countries carried out as part of the project, a similar separate review of the Azerbaijani tea sector was also published under the FAO Investment Centre's Knowledge for Investment (K4I) programme. Tea has a long tradition of cultivation in Azerbaijan and Georgia, dating back to the nineteenth century. The structural changes that followed the collapse of the Soviet Union in the early 1990s led to a dramatic decline of the two countries’ tea sectors. However, interest in tea production in Georgia and Azerbaijan has increased in recent years and, in an effort to revive their once thriving tea sectors, governments have adopted sector development programmes that provide for support to primary tea production. In spite of the long tradition and accumulated know-how of tea production and processing, there is little doubt that investments in both technology and knowledge will be required for the Azerbaijani and Georgian tea sectors to grow in a successful and sustainable way. Production focused on efficiency and quality and mindful of shifts in consumer preferences on global markets, but also of potential environmental risks, will be critical in achieving this goal. This publication is part of the Country Investment Highlights series under the FAO Investment Centre's Knowledge for Investment (K4I) programme.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Document
    Georgia: Protection of Georgian Wine Appellations
    Compliation of Project Documents - April 2008
    2008
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Georgian wine appellations are protected under Georgian and international law, but enforcement of legal arrangements has been weak. In 2005, EBRD asked FAO to help Georgia improve the protection of Georgian wine appellations and commissioned a technical assistance project under the FAO/EBRD Cooperation Programme. The project had two phases over two years: 1) identification of issues leading to counterfeiting of Georgian wines, and 2) recommendations to the Georgian Government to improve the situ ation and help authorities, in particular, draft new regulations under Georgian law. This publication is a compilation of the inputs prepared by FAO during project implementation. Most of the project outputs were delivered as planned and key Georgian wine sector professionals also gained experience in international practice in the area of appellation protection.

Users also downloaded

Showing related downloaded files

No results found.