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Enhancing nutrition in emergency and resilience agriculture responses to prevent child wasting

FAO's child wasting prevention action plan (2023–2024)










FAO. 2022. Enhancing nutrition in emergency and resilience agriculture responses to prevent child wasting. FAO’s child wasting prevention action plan (2023–2024). Rome.



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    Policy brief
    NENA Regional Network on Nutrition-Sensitive Food System – Policy Brief
    Building resilience and protecting diets in fragile and conflict-affected contexts
    2021
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    Crises, including those caused by conflict, disrupt regular community practices and essential services. Populations are often displaced, while food production, storage, processing, distribution and consumption can be significantly impacted. Likewise, caring and feeding for infants and young children can be disturbed, along with sanitary and healthy conditions. Malnutrition and hunger rates thus tend to raise and large amounts of people might lack the possibility to fulfil basic and immediate human needs, such as water and food. In crisis, the most affected ones tend to be infant and young children, pregnant and lactating mothers, elderly and disabled people. It is essential for emergency response and humanitarian aid to protect lives, restore livelihoods and rehabilitate food systems as fast as possible. During this period, it is also important to protect infant and young child feeding, and ensure meals for pregnant and lactating mothers are in sufficient quantity quality, safety and diversity. It is also important that elderly and disabled people received adequate support. It is important to ensure that humanitarian assistance and resilience operations adequately monitor the hunger and nutrition situation in order to prepare for, prevent and respond to degradations. Response should consider the needs of the most vulnerable groups such as women, children, elderly and disabled people. The well-targeted assistance with appropriate information and indicators can help reducing deterioration of nutritional status of vulnerable groups. Therefore, related assessments for should consider integrating nutrition information to determine the nutritional situation and develop better-targeted support. Assessment of the nutritional needs of different age groups; monitoring of the adequacy of dietary intake before, during and after the emergency; evaluation of the changes in food habits and practices, including coping strategies, are thus paramount. During emergencies, many children are admitted to specialized treatment centres (Therapeutic and Supplementary Feeding Centres) due to the acute and severe nutrition situation and receive life-saving support. Knowledge of nutritional requirements and proper feeding and caring practices is essential for the recovery of these children. However, families and caregivers often face difficulties in caring for children after the discharge due to the lack of knowledge on how to feed and care for children during humanitarian emergencies. Therefore, resilience and emergency response operations can add value by integrating nutrition education and improved feeding and caring practices for infant and young children as part of the interventions. The emergency operations that primarily look at the distribution of agriculture inputs (i.e. seeds, fertilizers,
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    Project
    COVID-19 and Child Labour in Agrifood Systems - GCP/GLO/1010/GER 2023
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    Child labour endangers the health and education of children and represents an obstacle to sustainable agricultural development and food security. Child labourers are likely to remain poor, perpetuating the cycle of poverty and hunger, and, in turn, hindering agricultural and rural development. Over recent decades, progress has been made , in particular in the sectors of industry and services. However, this progress has been significantly threatened by the COVID 19 crisis, particularly in the agriculture sector, which remained the one sector to have seen an increase in child labour . At their release, ILO UNICEF 2020 global estimates on child labour indicated that, without mitigation measures, the number of children in child labour could rise by the end of 2022 to 168.9 million. Although most child labour is found in the agriculture sector, the impact of the COVID 19 pandemic on child labour in agrifood systems had yet to be adequately explored. It was therefore critical to document more precisely the characteristics and dynamics of the impact of the pandemic on child labour per region, with attention to the different subsectors of agriculture. The objective of the project was thus to inform future actions to end child labour in agrifood systems, assessing the similarities of the impact of the COVID 19 pandemic with other crises.
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    Booklet
    Gender dimensions of child labour in agriculture
    Background paper
    2021
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    Child labour undermines efforts to eradicate hunger, malnutrition and poverty for present and future generations. According to the latest estimates, at the beginning of 2020 there were 160 million children involved in child labour globally, corresponding to almost one in ten of all children worldwide. Of this total, 70 percent were engaged in agriculture, making the sector the primary source of child labour. Therefore, the progress or failure of SDG 8.7 – “eradicating child labour globally by 2025” – will be decided in agriculture. In accordance with the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations’ Framework on Ending Child Labour in Agriculture (FAO, 2020) and as a contribution to the 2021 International Year for the Elimination of Child Labour, this paper highlights the often-neglected gender dimension of child labour in agriculture. It focuses mostly on the conditions of rural girls, because their work is often “invisible”, less valued, and associated with specific gender-based challenges such as overburdening with household chores, restrictions on personal freedom, and gender-based violence.

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