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Data and analytics to enhance inclusive rural transformation










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    Project
    Accelerating Inclusive Agricultural Transformation through Agricultural Policy Monitoring and Evidence-Based Reform - MTF/GLO/543/BMG 2022
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    An enabling policy environment is a key condition for agricultural development, food security and broader poverty reduction. Despite this, government policy analysts and decision makers in developing countries often lack the capacity to generate reliable and economically robust ex post evidence on, and ex ante assessments of, the impact of their policies on farmers, other local value chain actors, consumers and the wider economy. As a result, agricultural policies are often incoherent and inconsistent with the overarching agricultural sector goals stated in national strategies and investment plans. FAO has been implementing Phase I of the initiative Monitoring and Analysing Food and Agricultural Policies (MAFAP I) since 2009. In that time, it has successfully worked with national government policy analysts and policy makers to create policy monitoring systems and a consistent set of policy and public expenditure analyses across a wide range of agricultural value chains in ten countries. Having identified and assessed in the first phase of the initiative some of the key policy constraints affecting agricultural producers, MAFAP II was designed to carry the process forward, while also supporting governments to develop options for reforming problematic policies, with a view to further incentivizing and serving value chain actors, in particular smallholder farmers.
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    Project
    Capacity Building for the Management of Small-Pelagic Fisheries in Eritrea - TCP/ERI/3606 2020
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    Eritrea’s agriculture, forestry and fisheries sectors account for 17 percent of the country’s annual gross domestic product (GDP), but the fisheries sub-sector only contributes 18 percent of this value, or 3 percent of the national total. Annual per capita fish consumption is low in Eritrea, with an estimated annual per capita fish consumption of 0.4 kilograms, compared to an African-wide average of 9.8 kilograms. In fact, low dietary diversity and access to protein-rich foods among certain segments of the population continues to be a problem, especially among the rural, coastal and more isolated communities, many of whom work in or depend on small-scale fisheries. In addition, fish food consumption remains skewed towards urban populations. From having the second lowest Human Development Index (HDI) out of the 188 countries assessed in 2015 to experiencing high levels of inter-annual variability in market, export and exchange rate activities, Eritrea has an underdeveloped private investment context from which productivity gains and economic diversification could otherwise prosper. The small-pelagic fisheries sector, for instance, has the potential to yield cost-effective investments at scale while actively contributing to poverty reduction and food security and nutrition. With 2 500 kilometers of coastline, including the Dahlak Archipelago where small-pelagic fish varieties are found, Eritrea’s potential in developing its fisheries sector has been halted by a complex, post-independence socioeconomic context. Recent declines in output, employment and income in the small-scale fisheries sector were not due to overfishing or unsustainable natural resource practices. Instead, this is part of broader programmatic and institutional challenges in national sustainable development plans. The Government of Eritrea has therefore published its Interim Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper, identifying three priorities for the fisheries sector.  Increase the profitability of artisanal fisheries by strengthening rural cooperatives and linking them to high-value export markets;  Boost export earnings by creating suitable investment climates for investors; and  Strengthen resource management practices to ensure environmental sustainability.
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    Book (series)
    The State of Food Security and Nutrition in the World 2021
    Transforming food systems for food security, improved nutrition and affordable healthy diets for all
    2021
    In recent years, several major drivers have put the world off track to ending world hunger and malnutrition in all its forms by 2030. The challenges have grown with the COVID-19 pandemic and related containment measures. This report presents the first global assessment of food insecurity and malnutrition for 2020 and offers some indication of what hunger might look like by 2030 in a scenario further complicated by the enduring effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. It also includes new estimates of the cost and affordability of healthy diets, which provide an important link between the food security and nutrition indicators and the analysis of their trends. Altogether, the report highlights the need for a deeper reflection on how to better address the global food security and nutrition situation.To understand how hunger and malnutrition have reached these critical levels, this report draws on the analyses of the past four editions, which have produced a vast, evidence-based body of knowledge of the major drivers behind the recent changes in food security and nutrition. These drivers, which are increasing in frequency and intensity, include conflicts, climate variability and extremes, and economic slowdowns and downturns – all exacerbated by the underlying causes of poverty and very high and persistent levels of inequality. In addition, millions of people around the world suffer from food insecurity and different forms of malnutrition because they cannot afford the cost of healthy diets. From a synthesized understanding of this knowledge, updates and additional analyses are generated to create a holistic view of the combined effects of these drivers, both on each other and on food systems, and how they negatively affect food security and nutrition around the world.In turn, the evidence informs an in-depth look at how to move from silo solutions to integrated food systems solutions. In this regard, the report proposes transformative pathways that specifically address the challenges posed by the major drivers, also highlighting the types of policy and investment portfolios required to transform food systems for food security, improved nutrition, and affordable healthy diets for all. The report observes that, while the pandemic has caused major setbacks, there is much to be learned from the vulnerabilities and inequalities it has laid bare. If taken to heart, these new insights and wisdom can help get the world back on track towards the goal of ending hunger, food insecurity, and malnutrition in all its forms.

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