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Economic guidelines for strategic planning of tsetse and trypanosomiasis control in West Africa













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    Long-term tse-tse and trypanosomiasis management options in West Africa 2004
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    Tsetse-transmitted animal trypanosomiasis is a complex disease that directly and indirectly has an impact on Africa’s crop and livestock agricultural development. In this paper, state-of-the-art spatial tools are applied to study the variety of agro- ecological settings in West Africa with a view to providing decision support to the management of the tsetse and trypanosomiasis ( T& problem according to the prevailing agro- ecological conditions. Based on the analytical mapping of dominant lives tock systems, land- use patterns, integration of livestock and crop agriculture ( mixed farming) and geoclimatic factors affecting tsetse ecology ( northern dry band with fragmented tsetse populations and southern humid band where tsetse are widespread), priority areas for T& T intervention were identified. These areas are situated the northern band of the tsetse belt where: • tsetse populations are fragmented ( and therefore vulnerable) or confined only to suitable vegetation along main river courses; • fly reinvasion risk is minimal due to land pressure and adverse climatic conditions for tsetse; and • integration of crop and livestock agriculture prevails. In these areas, the elimination of the fly and the disease may be achievable and consolidated through the expansion and intensification of mixed farming, leading to maximal yield benefits when expressed in terms of sustainable agriculture and rural development.
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    Vector control and the elimination of gambiense human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) - Joint FAO/WHO Virtual Expert Meeting, 5-6 October 2021
    PAAT Meeting Report Series, No. 1
    2022
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    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) is a vector-borne parasitic disease transmitted by tsetse flies in sub-Saharan Africa. The gambiense form of the disease (gHAT) is endemic in western and central Africa and is responsible for more than 95 percent of the HAT cases reported annually. In the road map for neglected tropical diseases 2021–2030, WHO targeted gHAT for elimination of transmission by 2030. FAO supports this goal within the framework of the Programme against African Trypanosomosis (PAAT). In the framework of the WHO network for HAT elimination, FAO and WHO convened a virtual expert meeting to review vector control in the context of gHAT elimination. The experts included health officials from endemic countries and representatives from research and academic institutions, international organizations and the private sector. Seven endemic countries provided reports on recent and ongoing vector control interventions against gHAT at national level (i.e. Angola, Cameroon, Côte d’Ivoire, Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Guinea and Uganda). The country reports were followed by thematic sessions on various aspects of vector control: tools, costs, community-based approaches, monitoring and reporting. Tsetse control was also discussed in the broader framework of One Health, and in particular in relation to the control of animal trypanosomosis. This report presents a summary of the findings and lessons learned.
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    Socio-economic and cultural factors in the research and control trypanosomiasis 2003
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    African animal trypanosomiasis affects the entire economy of livestock-agricultural production in vast zones of tsetse-infested areas. The presence of the diasease influences where people decide to live and the management of their livestock. Trypanosomiasis has, therefore, cultural and socio-economic implications on teh day-to-day life of the rural comunities of affected areas. In the past, cultural and socio-economic factors were not duly considered and incorporated as integral parts of a tsets e and trypanosomiasis (T&T) intervention programme. Nowadays, planners, policy-and-decision makers have realized that the research and control of T&T need to embrace the understanding the socio-economic and cultural impacts of of the disease.

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