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Planning Communication for Agricultural Disaster Risk Management: A Field Guide










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    Booklet
    Agriculture-related investments in disaster risk reduction and management. Preliminary findings
    Global and regional trends between 2004 and 2016
    2019
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    The increased frequency and severity of natural hazards and disasters, partly largely caused by climate change and variability, has adverse serious negative impacts on the agriculture sectors, threatening peoples’ lives and livelihoods as well as national economies. To tackle this challenge, it is important to invest in disaster risk reduction measures that can both increase sustainable agricultural production and boost the resilience of current and future generations. Even in the absence of a disasters event, these investments can yield provide significant benefits, for example by encouraging households to protect existing assets and build new ones, as well as by promoting entrepreneurship and stimulating innovation. At the global level, the international community made a commitment though the 2015-2030 Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030 to increase investments in prevention and preparedness. The guiding principle of this framework states that it is far more effective to invest prior before to a disaster, rather than to focusing on post-disaster measures. However lack of data related to investments in disaster risk reduction for the agriculture sectors makes it difficult to understand the current state of such financial commitments in this area. Without accurate information we cannot effectively measure investment needs and progress made in addressing risks related to climate change and disasters. The purpose of this study, conducted by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), is to address this knowledge gap and provide quantitative evidence of trends in agriculture-related investment to prevention and preparedness, reconstruction, relief and rehabilitation, as well as emergency response measures at global and regional levels. We believe that the findings of this analysis will support investment planning in national governments, international financing institutions, the United Nations and resource partners.
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    Document
    FAO Regional Programme Framework for Disaster Risk Management 2010 -2013
    Reducing and managing disaster risk to improve food and livelihood security in Eastern and Central Africa
    2010
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    Each year, countries in the Eastern and Central region of Africa (ECA) experience the highest number of natural hazards and people -induced disasters in all of Africa. More and more people are adversely affected by natural hazards, such as droughts and floods, as well as crop and livestock diseases, civil conflicts, unstable market conditions and volatile food prices, gender inequalities and HIV. As they result in the loss of lives, assets and livelihoods, these natural and people-induced disast ers affect men and women differently and, at the same time, weaken the social support systems. Given the complex nature of often simultaneous and protracted crises affecting ECA, coordinated action towards adopting a more holistic approach is needed. Such an approach would integrate disaster risk reduction (pre-disaster preparedness, prevention and mitigation) into emergency response and post-disaster recovery strategies. In line with this need, FAO has elaborated a new Strategic Framewo rk that will serve as the foundation for the regional disaster risk management (DRM) programme in Eastern and Central Africa. The regional approach is based on the new corporate strategy aimed at improving preparedness and response to food and agricultural threats and emergencies by effectively linking short- and long-term interventions through disaster risk reduction (preparedness, prevention and mitigation), emergency response and transition options. This Regional DRM Programme Framewo rk provides an integrated approach to disaster risk reduction (DRR) and DRM interventions on natural hazards, crises and threats common to countries in ECA and acts as a platform for the development of national Plans of Action (PoAs). This Framework is intended as a working document, subject to change, aimed at supporting the development and implementation of DRR and DRM efforts in food and agriculture in coordination with governments, regional economic commissions (RECs), African Union (AU), UN -system, particularly the other two Rome-based agencies (the World Food Programme [WFP] and the International Fund for Agricultural Development [IFAD]), NGOs and other stakeholders in the region. Three main programme priorities are foreseen for 2010-2013: (1) to enhance and promote risk reduction concepts and practices in programming; (2) to increase the timeliness and quality of emergency response to disasters, crises and threats; and (3) to integrate transition concepts and linkages related t o transforming risks into programming. The overall objective of the Regional DRM Programme Framework is to lessen the adverse impacts of hazards, to reduce vulnerability and to strengthen community resilience, in an effort to help the countries in the region to become more food secure and to enable them to focus on developing sustainable food and agriculture systems. The following countries will be covered by this regional programme: Burundi, the Central African Republic (CAR), the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Rwanda, Sudan, Somalia, Tanzania and Uganda.
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    Booklet
    Guidance note: Risk communication and community engagement
    Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic
    2020
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    Information is a form of assistance in itself. Access to accurate information can allow people to make informed decisions to protect themselves. Moreover, understanding drivers of behaviour and integrating that understanding into communication approaches can make information more likely to result in desired action. Preparedness and response activities should be based on protection and related “do no harm” principles and conducted in a participatory manner that is informed by community feedback. Communication efforts must respond to stakeholder concerns, mis/disinformation and behavioral factors. Transparent and consistent messaging in local languages through trusted channels can help address barriers to change. Furthermore, by using community-based networks, engaging key influencers and building local capacities, communication can more effectively mitigate risks to more efficiently establish the authority and trust required to rapidly mount responses. Hence, Risk communication and community engagement (RCCE) refers to the processes and approaches to systematically consult, engage and communicate with communities who are at risk, or whose practices affect risk. The aim is to encourage, enable and include stakeholders in the prevention of and response to risks by adapting communication to local realities. In the case of COVID-19, RCCE enables authorities and communities to work together to promote healthy behaviour and reduce the risk of spreading infectious diseases. The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) developed this guidance note to support Pillar IV of the country-level activities under the framework of FAO’s component of the Global Humanitarian Response Plan for COVID-19: “Ensuring food supply chain actors are not at risk of COVID 19 transmission” through risk communication and community engagement (RCCE), together with the World Health Organization (WHO) and national authorities. In alignment with the Organization’s commitments on Accountability to Affected Populations (AAP), this guidance note aims to support country offices in designing and implementing inclusive RCCE initiatives.

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