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Rescuing, restoring and protecting seed systems in emergencies










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    Booklet
    Foundations for rebuilding seed systems post Cyclone Idai – Achievements and insights from project implementation.
    Malawi, Mozambique and Zimbabwe
    2023
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    When Cyclones Idai and Kenneth made landfall in Southern Africa in March and April 2019 respectively, the consequences were devastating for farmers, who lost local seed reserves including crop wild relatives and crops ready for harvest. The cyclones and related floods affected more than 3.8 million people in Southern Africa and destroyed nearly 800 000 hectares of standing crops in Malawi, Mozambique and Zimbabwe. Next to emergency relief efforts on food, health and shelter, the project 'Foundations for rebuilding seed systems post Cyclone Idai: Malawi, Mozambique and Zimbabwe' aimed to improve food and nutrition security and livelihoods in the longer term. In the project, national gene banks and farmers collaborated to rescue, regenerate and return seed to affected communities in Malawi, Mozambique and Zimbabwe, and to strengthen national and regional planning for the protection of local seed systems in the future. The project has been implemented by the International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture (ITPGRFA) and FAO in partnership with the national gene banks of Malawi, Mozambique and Zimbabwe and was financially supported by the Government of Germany and the Kingdom of Norway. This report summarizes the achievements and insights of the project from September 2019 until September 2022.
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    Infographic
    Seed rescue and conservation following disasters 2021
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    After disasters, restoring and conserving local seed supply is crucial for food and nutrition security. However, rescuing and restoring seed systems is often not considered in national or regional emergency response planning. This flow-chart shows how farmers, extension workers, non-governmental organizations and genebanks can work together and tap into the International Plant Treaty’s global genepool to rebuild local seed systems. It provides a summary of steps to be taken, both to conserve the seed diversity that is left or at risk of disappearing and to find and retrieve new planting materials that are preferred and needed by farming communities. The steps in the flow-chart are informed by a joint Food and Agriculture Organization and International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture project, implemented by the genebanks of Malawi, Mozambique and Zimbabwe.
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    Book (series)
    Terminal evaluation of the project “Strengthening capacities of agricultural producers to cope with climate change for increased food security through the Farmer Field School approach in Mozambique”
    Project code: GCP/MOZ/112/LDF - GEF ID: 5433
    2023
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    Mozambique is a low income country, with almost 70 percent of the population living in rural areas. Farmers suffer from lack of access to technology and qualified technical services. The country is also extremely vulnerable to increasingly prevalent natural phenomena, such as cyclones Dineo, Idai and Kenneth, which destroyed crops and agricultural infrastructure between 2017 and 2019. The country faces challenges in implementing regulatory instruments for the integration of practices climate change adaptation (CCA) in the agricultural sector. The Government of Mozambique, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and the Global Environment Facility (GEF) have joined efforts to increase the capacity of Mozambique's agricultural and pastoral sectors to deal with climate change. The project generated relevant results, including the incorporation of specific actions for CCA in strategic plans at ministerial level and in Economic and Social Plans and District Budgets (PESOD); the preparation of Mozambique's nationally determined contribution (NDC); the creation of local and community plans to adapt to climate change; the installation of 11 agrometeorological stations and greater financial autonomy for beneficiary women. The evaluation recommended that FAO support the government to ensure the integration of CCA into key policy documents and the integration of the Farmer Field Schools (FFS) into future rural development programmes, including the new Sustenta Programme, and that, in future programmes, FAO will focus on developing value chains and promoting farmers' access to markets.

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