Thumbnail Image

Evaluation of the FAO Strategy for Partnerships with the Private Sector

Thematic evaluation series










Briefing note

Annex 1. Terms of Reference

Annex 2. Evaluation synthesis study

Annex 3. Comparator study

Annex 4. Timeline of Private Sector Strategy

Annex 5. Logical map of evaluation findings, conclusions and recommendations

PC document

Management response


FAO. 2019. Evaluation of the FAO Strategy for Partnerships with the Private Sector. Rome.


Also available in:
No results found.

Related items

Showing items related by metadata.

  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    FAO Strategy for Partnerships with Civil Society Organizations 2013
    FAO has been working for many years with hundreds of civil society organizations (NGOs, community-based organizations, professional associations, networks, etc.) in technical work, emergency field operations, training and capacity building, and advocacy of best agricultural practices. Over the past years, civil society organizations (CSOs) have evolved in terms of coordination, structure, outreach, mobilization and advocacy capacity. In this period, FAO has also undergone changes i n management, revised its Strategic Framework and given a new impetus to decentralization. Therefore, a review of the existing 1999 FAO Policy and Strategy for Cooperation with Non-Governmental and Civil Society Organizations was needed. The FAO Strategy for Partnerships with Civil Society considers civil society as those non-state actors that work in the areas related to FAO’s mandate. It does not address partnerships with academia, research institutions or philanthropic found ations, as they will be treated in other FAO documents. Food producers’ organizations, given their specific nature and relevance in relation to FAO’s mandate, will be considered separately. In principle, as they usually are for-profit, they will fall under the FAO Strategy for Partnerships with the Private Sector, unless these organizations state otherwise and comply with the criteria for CSOs. These cases will be addressed individually. The Strategy identifies six areas of colla boration and two levels of interaction with different rationales and modus operandi: global-headquarters and decentralized (regional, national, local). The main focus of this Strategy is in working with civil society at th e decentralized level. In its Reviewed Strategic Framework, FAO has defined five Strategic Objectives to eradicate poverty and food insecurity. To achieve this, the Organization is seeking to expand its collaboration with CSOs committed to these objectives.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (series)
    Evaluation of FAO’s support to climate action (SDG 13) and the implementation of the FAO Strategy on Climate Change (2017) 2021
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    This evaluation assesses the extent to which FAO adopted an effective, coherent and transformative approach to its work on climate action from 2015 to 2020, by contributing to the achievement of SDG 13 targets and the Paris Agreement. The methodology included portfolio analysis, quantitative content analysis of over 500 documents, participatory stakeholder workshops, desk reviews, interviews with 488 stakeholders, analysis of key FAO products, 3 global surveys, and 13 country case studies. The evaluation’s findings are (i) FAO’s Strategic Framework is aligned with SDG 13 and the Paris Agreement. However, FAO has not expressed a long-term vision on its leadership role in agriculture for climate action; nor does FAO governance yet reflect a clear and strategic focus on its mission on climate action; (ii) The 2017 Climate Change Strategy has effectively supported FAO’s work, but it is not fully integrated into corporate decision-making; (iii) FAO has made relevant contributions by supporting national capacity building for climate action; (iv) FAO’s contributions to SDG 13 and the uptake of products and tools are not systematically monitored and reported; (v) There is little alignment of portfolios between divisions and no systematic approach to trade-offs. Consequently, the root causes of climate change on agriculture are not being addressed in an integrated way; (vi) FAO has strong capacity, but the current business model results in uneven distribution of human and financial resources and in fragmented, short-term projects reach; (vii) FAO contributed to climate adaptation and mitigation by collaborating with Members and other partners, although it has engaged less in innovative partnerships with the private sector, financing institutions and civil society; (viii) FAO has progressed on the inclusion of gender-specific climate action initiatives. The recommendations of the evaluation include developing a corporate narrative on climate change and food systems; formulating a new Climate Change Strategy and action plan; improving the climate change labelling of its project portfolio; mainstreaming climate action into all offices, divisions and levels, and including coordination and guidance to embed procedures in the project cycle, quality assurance and learning mechanisms; adopting a climate action-focused programmatic approach; running an assessment to identify capacity gaps, needs and opportunities and, accordingly, strengthening the capacity of staffing, funding and inter-office communication; enhancing its partnerships and seeking out innovative partnerships; and mainstreaming the core “leave no one behind” by including women, youth, the extreme poor, indigenous peoples and other vulnerable groups.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    FAO Strategy for Partnerships with the Private Sector 2013
    FAO Strategy for Partnerships with the Private Sectorhas been prepared in response to the comments of the Programme and Finance Committee, and is aligned with ongoing efforts for decentralization, the review of FAO’s Strategic Framework and the Organization-wide Strategy on Partnerships, within the context of the Director-General’s overall vision for transformational change of the Organization. The revised Strategy has been informed by an extensive internal consultation with Members and FAO’s se nior management, as well as with representatives of multinational corporations (MNCs), private foundations and industry representative bodies. FAO recognizes that the private sector is a key stakeholder in the fight against food insecurity, malnutrition and rural poverty, and acknowledges the potential that better coordination and collaboration between the public and private sectors can offer in the delivery of the Organization’s Strategic Objectives. The Organization, therefore, takes an open a nd pro-active approach to optimizing the benefits of closer collaboration. In this regard, FAO will consider engaging with all private sector entities, including small and medium enterprises (SMEs), cooperatives and producers’ organizations, local companies through to MNCs. This Strategy has been elaborated on the following premises: i) given the intrinsic nature of its membership and governance, the main interlocutors of FAO are the Members; and ii) the basic texts, rules, procedures or composi tion of FAO’s governing bodies will not be affected by this strategy.

Users also downloaded

Showing related downloaded files

No results found.