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FAO Ethiopia Achievement Report





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    Document
    Global Forest Resources Assessment 2010 - Country Report: Ethiopia 2010
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    Book (stand-alone)
    FAO Sub-Regional Office for Eastern Africa (SFE) Plan of action for Ethiopia - July 2010 to June 2012
    Disaster Risk Management
    2010
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    Ethiopia continues to experience disasters of a serious magnitude, and many people are affected by shocks such as drought and flooding, as well as crop and livestock diseases, conflicts, unstable markets, and other events that result in loss of lives, assets and support systems. The “State of Food Insecurity in the World 2010” 1 lists Ethiopia as one of the 22 countries in the world in a protracted crisis due to periodic natural and human-induced disasters. Protracted crises can become a v icious cycle, posing ongoing and fundamental threats to both lives and livelihoods, from which recovery may become progressively more difficult over time. Finding ways to address the complex nature of protracted crises, therefore, requires coordinated action and a holistic approach to reduce the risks posed by disasters and their impact. Recognising the growing need in Ethiopia to improve and enhance the effectiveness and efficiency of disaster risk management (DRM), FAO is partnering with the Ethiopian Government and relevant stakeholders in placing increased emphasis on DRM programmes. FAO uses the DRM approach to reduce the vulnerability of people before, during and after crisis. A key goal is increasing community resilience to future hazards with actions that are aimed at facilitating the transition from relief to development.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    FAO Sub-Regional Office for Eastern Africa (SFE) Conservation Agriculture in Ethiopia
    Proceedings of the workshop, 6th July 2010, Addis Ababa
    2010
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    The benefit of conservation agriculture (CA) in terms of safeguarding the environment and improving labour and agricultural productivity has been well recognized all over the world. It makes better use of agricultural resources through the integrated management of available soil, water and biological resources, combined with limited external inputs. In addition, it contributes to environmental conservation and sustainable agriculture by maintaining a permanent organic soil cover. Adoption of CA at the farm level is associated with lower labour and farm-power inputs, more stable yields and improved soil nutrient exchange capacity. Crop production profitability under CA tends to increase over time, relative to conventional agriculture. Other benefits attributed to CA, at the watershed level, relate to more regular surface hydrology and reduced sediment loads in surface water. At the global level, CA sequesters carbon, thereby decreasing CO2 in the atmosphere and helping to re duce the effect of climate change.

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