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Land Degradation Neutrality in Small Island Developing States

Technical Report










UNCCD and FAO. 2020. Land Degradation Neutrality in Small Island Developing States: Technical Report. Bonn, Germany.




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    Land degradation neutrality in small island developing states
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    2020
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    During COP 13, the Global Mechanism of the UNCCD and FAO strengthened their collaborative efforts to support Small Island Developing States (SIDS) to set national targets to achieve LDN. The purpose was to identify lessons learned from the LDN target setting process in SIDS in order to generate recommendations to policy makers and interested stakeholders on future actions and to consider cross-cutting issues and linkages between emerging and existing challenges and priorities. This briefing note presents an overview of these recommendations.
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    LADA Local Land Degradation Assessment Adapted for Small Island Developing States 2017
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    Sustainable management of the natural resource base is a fundamental issue to support global environmental benefits provided by ecosystem services, and to ensure agricultural production and ultimately food security and livelihoods. Assessing land degradation is a major component of effective sustainable land management particularly in Small Island Developing States (SIDS). SIDS are generally characterized by high levels of chronic poverty, largely rural based populations and dependence on tradit ional agriculture. At the same time, SIDS possess unique characteristics, that further exacerbates the problems associated with land degradation, given the small size of the countries and their economies, limited infrastructure, distance from large international markets, high vulnerability to natural disasters, low level of human resource development, and increasing urbanization. Small size, combined with, diverse soil types, topography, climatic variation, lack or in some cases archaic and poor land use policies limits the area available for urban settlement, agriculture, mining, commercial forestry, tourism and other infrastructure, and creates intense competition between land use options. This manual adapts the assessment methodologies which were developed under the LADA project to the particular situation of SIDS. It is built on country experiences and is expected to enhance the capacity of the user to conduct more integrated and participatory assessments of land degradation, and t o monitor impacts of interventions or changes in land management more effectively. The manual reflects a substantial shift in attention from the conventional focus on assessing degradation, to a balanced assessment that looks at both the negative and positive effects and trends of land use/ management on the natural resources and ecosystem services.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Land degradation neutrality
    A rationale for using participatory approaches to monitor and assess rangeland health
    2021
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    In rangelands and grasslands, land degradation has an immediate and local impact by disrupting ecosystems from functioning, threatening livelihoods and negatively affecting social cohesion. It also threatens productivity while dovetailing with the threats of climate change in these ecologically fragile areas. The understanding of land degradation in rangelands and grasslands is weak, which is attributed to a lack of robust data and a misunderstanding of management objectives. The day-to-day management of land by pastoral communities is intricately linked to local and traditional knowledge that needs to be taken into account when monitoring the health of ecosystems and designing management interventions. Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 15 Life on land includes Land Degradation Neutrality (LDN) as a target, which requires that the process of degradation is halted and reversed. This publication presents a rationale for participatory approaches to achieve LDN in pastoral areas while showing how this can be achieved using the Participatory Rangelands and Grasslands Assessment (PRAGA) that has been piloted in Kenya, the Niger, Burkina Faso, Uruguay and Kyrgyzstan.

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