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The ecological basis of rainforest management








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    Book (stand-alone)
    Factors Affecting Productivity of Tropical Forest Plantations: Acacia, Eucalypt, Teak, Pine
    GLOBAL FIBRE SUPPLY STUDY - Working Paper Series
    1997
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    Gains from a good tree improvement program (starting with species/provenance matching to site) can usually result in considerable gain in wood yields from tropical forest plantations. Optimal nursery and silvicultural practices (including seed pre-treatment, application of nitrogen-fixing soil micro-organisms, optimal spacing for defined end use, selection of adequate site, fertilization, and irrigation) can considerably increase such gains further. This report summarizes literature on gains tha t might be expected by implementing tree improvements and optimal silvicultural practices for acacias, eucalypts, teak and pines in tropical areas. Results are presented for each genus in turn, first examining factors common to all the genera, and then focusing on unique factors. The data on tree-growth gains are extremely variable from study to study. They range from virtually no favourable response to tree improvement and optimal silviculture, to gains of many hundreds of percent over c ontrols. This of course complicates the matter of using such data in global fibre supply modelling.
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    Advancing assisted natural regeneration (ANR) in Asia and the Pacific 2003
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    Assisted natural regeneration (ANR) is a forest rehabilitation technique based on the ecological principle of secondary succession. It utilizes natural processes and promotes the regeneration of indigenous species. Because ANR relies on natural processes, it is especially effective in restoring and enhancing biological diversity and ecological processes. FAO and partner organizations convened a workshop and study on ANR in the Philippines in April 2002 to highlight the potential and opport unities of ANR as a restoration strategy. The workshop discussions and presentations underscored the importance of ANR in the broader context of sustainable forest management and the potential for cost-effective rehabilitation of forestlands through more aggressive implementation of ANR. This publication includes selected papers of the workshop dealing with the technical, environmental and social dimensions of ANR, as well as papers describing country initiatives.
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    Advancing the role of natural regeneration in large-scale forest and landscape restoration in the Asia-Pacific region
    19-21 June 2017, Nanning, Guangxi Province, China
    2018
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    There are numerous global, regional, national and even subnational targets for increasing forest area and forest restoration. In light of these global targets and emerging ambitious national commitments, it is imperative to develop low-cost strategies and techniques for landscape restoration. The most widely used restoration strategies involving planting of tree seedlings are often costly and their application for restoring vast expanses of degraded forest lands in the region may be limited. Case studies and experiences with natural regeneration from the region have shown that natural regeneration significantly reduces the cost of restoration in areas that meet certain conditions. Native species that are adapted to the prevailing conditions re-establish on their own with some assistance, achieving accelerated growth in accordance with natural succession, leading to the recovery of native ecosystems. Restoration strategies based on natural regeneration also provide low-cost opportunities for conserving biodiversity and enhancing ecosystem services, including carbon sequestration and watershed protection. Despite these economic and environmental advantages, natural regeneration is often overlooked when restoration policies and programmes are designed for a number of reasons. These include lack of its recognition as a viable restoration option; perverse incentives favouring clearing of young secondary growth for plantation development or other land uses; lack of institutional support by government agencies and other organizations; unclear tenure and property rights; lack of incentives for local communities; and uncertainty about the restoration processes and outcomes. This publication aims to share information on the outcome of the regional workshop, entitled ‘Promoting the Role of Natural Regeneration in Large-scale Forest and Landscape Restoration: Challenges and Opportunities, held in Nanning, Guangxi Province, China, from 19 to 21 June 2017, which was organized to better understand the challenges and opportunities for natural forest regeneration and to promote its inclusion as a major component of large-scale restoration initiatives.

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