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Evaluation of FAO/USAID Emerging Pandemic Threats Programme – Phase II (EPT-2)











Annex 1. Terms of Reference and evaluation matrix

Annex 2. Portfolio analysis

Annex 3. Survey data analysis

Management response

Follow-up report


FAO. 2021. Evaluation of FAO/USAID Emerging Pandemic Threats Programme – Phase II (EPT-2). Programme Evaluation Series, 03/2021. Rome. 



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    The United States Agency for International Development and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations are working together to keep the world safe from infectious disease threats. Their two key programmes – Global Health Security Agenda and Emerging Pandemic Threats – are building animal health capacity to prevent, detect and respond to disease threats in over 30 countries. The Global Health Security Agenda programme develops national capacity to prevent zoonotic and non-zoonotic diseases while quickly and effectively detecting and controlling diseases when they do emerge. The Emerging Pandemic Threats programme improves national capacity to pre-empt the emergence and re-emergence of infectious zoonotic disease and to prevent the next pandemic. Action against emerging pandemic threats is taken through projects on: Avian influenza, Middle East respiratory syndrome, Africa Sustainable Livestock 2050 and Emergency equipment stockpile. With high-impact diseases that jump from animals to humans on the rise, these programmes are reducing the risk to lives and livelihoods from national, regional and global disease spread.
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    Protecting people and animals from disease threats 2018
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    The United States Agency for International Development and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations are working together to keep the world safe from infectious disease threats. Their two key programmes – Global Health Security Agenda and Emerging Pandemic Threats – are building animal health capacity to prevent, detect and respond to disease threats in over 30 countries. The Global Health Security Agenda programme develops national capacity to prevent zoonotic and non-zoonotic diseases while quickly and effectively detecting and controlling diseases when they do emerge. The Emerging Pandemic Threats programme improves national capacity to pre-empt the emergence and re-emergence of infectious zoonotic disease and to prevent the next pandemic. Action against emerging pandemic threats is taken through projects on: Avian influenza, Middle East respiratory syndrome, Africa Sustainable Livestock 2050 and Emergency equipment stockpile. With high-impact diseases that jump from animals to humans on the rise, these programmes are reducing the risk to lives and livelihoods from national, regional and global disease spread.
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    Document
    FAO ECTAD Laporan Tahunan 2012 2012
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    The FAO Emergency Centre for Transboundary Animal Diseases (ectad) Programme works closely with the Government of Indonesia’s Ministry of Agriculture (MoA), provincial and district livestock services; the National Commission for Zoonoses Control (KOMNAS Zoonosis); the United Nations Country Team (UNCT), particularly the World Health Organization (WhHO) and the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP); the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), the US Department of Agricul ture (USDA), the Australia Indonesia Partnership Emerging Infectious Diseases (AIP-EID) Programme implemented by the Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry (DAFF), Assosiation South East Asia Nations (ASEAN), the US Center for Disease Control and Prevention (US-CDC), The Australian Centre For International Agricultural Research (ACIAR), the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA), and non-government partners such as the indonesian poultry veterinarians’ association (ADPHI), the National Poultry Health Committee (KKUN), the Strategies Against Flu Emergence (SAFE) project, and the JSI Deliver project. In relation to rabies control, FAO works closely with the Directorate General Livestock And Animal Health Services (DGLAHS) and Bali Livestock Services, and with DAFF, the World Society For The Protection Of Animals (WSPA), the Global Alliance For Rabies Control (GARC), the University Of Glasgow, UK and the University Of Sydney, Australia. Collectively, donor organization s fund some 7 international and 50 national staff contracted to FAO in Jakarta, South Sulawesi and Central Java. FAO staff are responsible for technical and administrative support to the HPAI Campaign Management Unit (CMU), Directorate of Animal Health (DAH), and local government animal health services, undertaking a range of activities in support of avian influenza control. Some staff members also provide strategic technical support on rabies control to the DAH and the Bali and NTT provincial a nd district livestock services. In 2012 the FAO ECTAD Programme in indonesia was primarily funded by the USAID and the Australian Agency For International Development (AUSAID), with funding for the ECTAD laboratory component and the DGLAHS Influenza Virus Monitoring (IVM) system from the IDENTIFY project of the USAID Emerging Pandemic Threats Programme. The DGLAHS-FAO rabies control programme was funded through an FAO Indonesia Technical Cooperation Project, an AUSAID funded project and a proje ct funded by USAID. ECTAD Indonesia wishes to express its deep gratitude to our donors and acknowledgment of the support of our technical partners.

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