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Production and utilization of fish silage

A manual on how to turn fish waste into profit and a valuable feed ingredient or fertilizer











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    Book (series)
    Fish waste management
    Assessment on potential production and utilization of fish silage in Bangladesh, Philippines and Thailand
    2021
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    A significant amount of fish by-products is produced during fish processing. These by-products represent 20–80 percent of the fish and provide a good source of macro- and micronutrients. Yet they often go unutilized, when they can easily be converted into a variety of products including fishmeal and oil, fish hydrolysates, fish collagen, fish sauce, fish biodiesel and fish leather. The production of fish silage using organic acid is a good example of the simple and inexpensive conversion processes which can be employed. Fish silage production uses minced by-products or minced whole fish unsuitable for human consumption as raw material, before adding a preservative to stabilize the mixture – usually an organic acid such as formic acid. The process breaks down protein into free amino acids and small-chain peptides which have nutritional and antimicrobial properties, therefore, the fish silage can be used as healthy feed and fertilizer. The feasibility studies on fish waste management in Bangladesh, Philippines and Thailand outline existing good practices on the utilization of by-products and fish waste. Furthermore, the insights provided on the potential production and utilization of fish silage in each country are promising in terms of increasing the productivity of the fisheries sector, reducing post-harvest waste, increasing economic value and improving environment sustainability.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Fish silage production and use in the Caribbean: Feasibility study for Barbados and Saint Kitts and Nevis 2020
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    It is estimated that per year in Barbados, 585 tonnes of fish waste are generated at the two main public fish markets, and 936 tonnes of waste are generated at private fish processors across the island. Therefore, Barbados produces an aggregate of 1 521 tonnes of fish waste annually. At present, approximately 90 percent of fish waste and by-products are discarded at the landfill. To produce fish silage on a large scale in Barbados the baseline cost (based on a 90 percent yield rate) is estimated to be USD 265 920, excluding the cost of fish waste and acids. Sales revenues based on competitor prices range from USD 528 485 to USD 2 044 900. During the fish silage demonstration workshop held from 23 to 26 July 2019 in Bridgetown, the cost of small-scale production (100 kg) was estimated to be USD 900 and USD 254 when using the chemical and biological methods, respectively. The existing regulatory framework has the potential to facilitate the production and utilization of fish silage. However, clearance and permission may have to be institutionalized in order for fish silage to be produced and utilized in, and or as, animal feed. These conclusive findings subsequently prompted FAO to engage in a partnership with the Caribbean Agriculture Research and Development Institute (CARDI), to develop the silage-based feeds and document their effects on the growth performance of select animals.
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    Project
    Technical reports - product by product development from Nile Perch (summary table) 1988
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    Since dairy meal is becoming increasingly expensive in Kenya and threatens the fish rearing industry, a systematic study was initiated on the possibility of using aquatic plants and Nile perch silage. The water plants, Azolla niloticus, Lemna perpusilla and Pistia striatotis were tested as a fishmeal for Tilapia zillii and riverine fishes. Low growth rates were achieved in the tilapias. The value of the Azolla protein in fish diet is discussed in relation to dietary requirement in cultured fish. This study demonstrates that the water plant Azolla niloticus together with Nile perch silage as a supplement can be used as a complete diet for cultured fish. It is hoped that the project will help provide detailed information on the nutritional value of the water plant Azolla niloticus and its long-term susceptibility to various inclusions as a complete feed, and conduct least cost feed formulations to make recommendations as to the maximum inclusion levels.

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