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The potential of farming tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) and freshwater prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii) in Vanuatu








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    Book (series)
    Farming freshwater prawns. A manual for the culture of the giant river prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii) 2002
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    This new manual, which replaces an earlier manual first issued in 1982, is an up-to-date practical guide to the farming of Macrobrachium rosenbergii. Many of the techniques described are also applicable to the culture of other species of freshwater prawns. The principle target audience is farmers and extension workers but it is also hoped that it will be useful for aquaculture lecturers and students. After a preliminary section on the biology of freshwater prawns, the manual covers site selectio n for hatcheries, nurseries and grow-out facilities, and the management of the broodstock, hatchery, nursery and grow-out phases of rearing. Harvesting and post-harvest handling are also covered and there are some notes on marketing freshwater prawns. The reference and bibliography section contains a list of relevant reviews, as well as other (mainly FAO) manuals on general aquaculture themes, such as water and soil management, topography, pond construction and simple economics. The management p rinciples described are illustrated by photographs and drawings. The manual contains annexes on specific topics such as the production of larval feeds, size variation, and stock estimation. The final annex is a glossary that lists not only the terms used in the manual itself but also those which may be found in other documents.
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    A strategic reassessment of fish farming potential in Africa 1998
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    The present study is an update of an earlier assessment of warm-water fish farming potential in Africa, by Kapetsky (1994). The objective of this study was to assess locations and areal expanses that have potential for warm-water and temperate-water fish farming in continental Africa. The study was based on previous estimates for Africa by the above author, and on estimates of potential for warm-water and temperate-water fish farming in Latin America by Kapetsky and Nath (1997). However, a nu mber of refinements have been made. The most important refinement was that new data allowed a sevenfold increase in resolution over that used in the previous Africa study, and a twofold increase over that of Latin America (i.e. to 3 arc minutes, equivalent to 5 km x 5 km grids at the equator), making the present results more usable in order to assess fish farming potential at the national level. A geographical information system (GIS) was used to evaluate each grid cell on the basis of severa l land-quality factors important for fish-farm development and operation regardless of the fish species used. Protected areas, large inland water bodies and major cities were identified as constraint areas, and were excluded from any fish farming development altogether. Small-scale fish farming potential was assessed on the basis of four factors: water requirement from ponds due to evaporation and seepage, soil and terrain suitability for pond construction based on a variety of soil attributes a nd slopes, availability of livestock wastes and agricultural by-products as feed inputs based on manure and crop potential, and farm-gate sales as a function of population density. For commercial farming, an urban market potential criterion was added based on population size of urban centres and travel time proximity. Both small-scale and commercial models were developed by weighting the above factors using a multi-criteria decision-making procedure. A bioenergetics model was incorporated int o the GIS to predict, for the first time, fish yields across Africa. A gridded water temperature data set was used as input to a bioenergetics model to predict number of crops per year for the following three species: Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus), African catfish (Clarias gariepinus) and Common carp (Cyprinus carpio). Similar analytical approaches to those by Kapetsky and Nath (1997) were followed in the yield estimation. However, different specifications were used for small-scale and co mmercial farming scenarios in order to reflect the types of culture practices found in Africa. Moreover, the fish growth simulation model, documented in Kapetsky and Nath (1997), was refined to enable consideration of feed quality and high fish biomass in ponds. The small-scale and commercial models derived from the land-quality evaluation were combined with the yield potential of each grid cell for each of the three fish species to show the coincidence of each land-quality suitability class with a range of yield potentials. Finally, the land quality-fish yield potential combinations were put together to show where the fish farming potential coincided for the three fish species. The results are generally positive. Estimates of the quality of land show that about 23% of continental Africa scored very suitable for both small-scale and commercial fish farming. For the three fish species, 50-76% of Africa's land has the highest yield range potential, and the spatial distribution of th is yield is quite similar among the species and farming systems. However, the spatial distribution of carp culture potential was greater than for Nile tilapia and African catfish. Combining the two farming system models with the favourable yields of the three fish species suggest that over 15% of the continent has land areas with high suitability for pond aquaculture.
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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Lessons from two decades of tilapia genetic improvement in Africa 2022
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    This summary briefly describes the main steps for establishing a tilapia breeding programme, together with the specific lessons learnt in Egypt. African aquaculture has increased in importance since 2000 due primarily to dwindling capture fisheries and its demonstrable success in Egypt, which is the only African country among the world’s top ten producers of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus). The success of tilapia aquaculture in Asia can in part be attributed to the Genetically Improved Farmed Tilapia (GIFT) project - a breeding programme carried out by WorldFish.

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