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Northeastern Nigeria | Response overview (April 2021)

Adamawa, Borno and Yobe states










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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Northeastern Nigeria | Response Overview (November 2021)
    Adamawa, Borno and Yobe states
    2021
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    The ongoing conflict in northeastern Nigeria and the economic impact of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic continue to exacerbate food insecurity and malnutrition in the region. The latest Cadre Harmonisé analysis (November 2021) conducted in 21 of Nigeria’s 36 states, as well as the Federal Capital Territory, indicated that about 12.9 million people are in high acute food insecurity (October–December 2021), of whom 2.4 million are in Adamawa, Borno and Yobe states. These figures are projected to increase to 18 million and 3.5 million, respectively, during the peak of next year’s lean season (June–August 2022), including 13 550 people likely to face catastrophic conditions, if food assistance along with resilience interventions are not urgently intensified and sustained. Providing the most vulnerable households with agricultural livelihoods assistance, including through the provision of quality inputs, remains critical to improve their food security and nutrition. During the dry season, FAO, in collaboration with other partners, is carrying out various interventions focusing on crop production, livestock keeping and aquaculture against potential seasonal food production disruptions and other climate-related shocks, by diversifying sources of food production and income. Beneficiary households are also provided with fuel-efficient stoves to mitigate risks linked to protection, deforestation, health and communal tensions over natural resources, as well as to improve the quality of food preparation, among others.
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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Northeastern Nigeria: Adamawa, Borno and Yobe states
    Response overview (April 2022)
    2022
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    The ongoing armed conflict in northeastern Nigeria as well as increased prices of food items and agricultural inputs have continued to negatively affect food security and nutrition in the region. Most farmers have reported production difficulties, mainly to access fertilizers, during the last rainy season, leading to reduced cultivated cropland area and harvests across five states, including in Adamawa, Borno and Yobe. The latest Cadre Harmonisé analysis (March 2022), which was conducted in 21 out of Nigeria's 36 states and in the Federal Capital Territory, indicated that about 19.5 million people are projected to experience crisis or worse levels of food insecurity (June–August 2022), if immediate actions are not taken. The provision of agricultural inputs to the most vulnerable households remains critical to ensure their food security and nutrition. FAO in collaboration with its partners has been implementing various interventions, including support for livestock and crop production, as well as value chain development and aquaculture to mitigate risks linked to seasonal crop failures and other climate-related shocks, to diversify households’ livelihoods and income sources. Beneficiaries are also provided with fuel-efficient stoves to mitigate risks linked to malnutrition, protection, deforestation, health and communal tensions over natural resources.
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    Northeastern Nigeria: Adamawa, Borno and Yobe states – Response overview (September 2023) 2023
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    The latest Cadre Harmonisé analysis (March 2023) conducted in 26 out of Nigeria’s 36 states, as well as the Federal Capital Territory, estimates that 24.8 million people countrywide were projected to be acutely food insecure during this year’s lean season (June–August 2023), of whom 4.35 million in the three northeastern states, if appropriate assistance is not provided. The planting season started in June in northeastern Nigeria, with farmers mostly engaging in rainfed agricultural practices. Over USD 68 million are urgently required to continue supporting households during the current agricultural season, as well as to begin the procurement of seeds and other inputs in time for the dry season support programme starting in October. Most crisis-affected households in Adamawa, Borno and Yobe are smallholder farmers who depend on agriculture for their livelihoods. Providing them with essential inputs is crucial to the humanitarian response. For example, investing USD 170 in a crop production package enables a farming household of seven people to produce staple food for about a year.

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