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Complementary information note on Gender








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    Policy brief
    Strengthening gender-responsive climate policies and actions in agrifood value chains 2022
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    Climate change can increase gender inequalities: while men can diversify into other commodities or migrate to other regions in search of economic opportunities in response to climate impacts, women often have more limited options, and therefore less resilience, due to their domestic responsibilities and poor access to resources and services. Failure to recognize the multiple roles performed by women along the agrifood value chain, and to address their specific needs and priorities often reduces their economic and social opportunities. This brief showcases promising research and innovation, particularly from countries engaged through the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) Flexible Multi-Partner Mechanism (FMM) 149 project. Senegal, Samoa and Zambia are highlighted as examples to inform policymakers, guide gender-responsive investments, policies, and strategies in countries’ work in response to climate change. This brief is part of a series. Other briefs on climate-smart agriculture, agrifood value chains and the livestock sector are available.
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    Policy brief
    Strengthening gender-responsive climate policies and actions in climate-smart agriculture 2022
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    Championing women as critical agents of change within their communities and in policy and decision-making processes at national and international levels is a fundamental step towards ensuring gender equality and climate-related issues are adequately addressed in agricultural policies and dialogue and considered by international climate finance mechanisms, government ministries and research institutions. Gender-responsive climate-smart agriculture refers to approaches that consider women’s and men’s specific priorities and their different access to resources, services, education and information to build climate resilience, through a focus on equality and agency. This brief showcases promising research and innovation, particularly from countries engaged through the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) Flexible Multi-Partner Mechanism (FMM) 149 project. Senegal, Uganda and Belize are highlighted as examples to inform policymakers, guide gender-responsive investments, policies, and strategies in countries’ work in response to climate change. This brief is part of a series. Other briefs on agrifood value chains, aquaculture and fisheries and the livestock sector are available.
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    Project
    Technical Support for Institutional and Capacity Enhancement on Gender-Sensitive Fisheries Management and Conservation - TCP/CMB/3705 2022
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    Fisheries are critically important for Cambodia With about 32 percent of the country consisting of either permanent or seasonal wetlands, and 435 km of coastline along estuaries, bays and islands, fisheries make a large contribution to diet and livelihoods In terms of food security, the apparent annual per capita consumption of fish is estimated to be 52 kg and as high as 76 kg in flood plain areas, representing about 70 percent of Cambodia’s intake of animal protein Overall, around 6 million people are involved in fisheries, around 50 percent of them are women, assuming major roles in cleaning, sorting and grading fish catches, although precise analysis on gender and child labour roles and involvement is still lacking and there is a recognized need to collect more sex disaggregated and gender specific data and information At present, it is estimated that 70 percent of Cambodian women and 59 percent of men are engaged in vulnerable employment, often in the agricultural sector, including fisheries Rural women often play a double role when contributing to household livelihoods, in reproductive and productive tasks (often unpaid) through the fish value chain.

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