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Technical Meeting on Understanding MERS-CoV at the Animal-Human Interface











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    Book (series)
    Technical Meeting on Understanding Ebola Virus at the Animal-Human Interface 2016
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    The Technical Meeting on Understanding Ebola Virus at the animal-human interface was convened by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) to determine the current status of the scientific knowledge on Ebola Viruses (EBOV), identify the major gaps that require further research studies, in order to better understand the disease dynamics at the interface between animals and humans, identify factors that potentiate the emergence, transmission and spread of EBOV, and develop practical and realistic approaches to better prevent and minimize the impacts of this virus. It was also aimed at fostering collaborations and partnerships between institutions and organizations working on Ebola viruses at the human-animal interface. The meeting was organized by FAO and the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) from 19-20 January 2016 in Rome.
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    Investigating potential recombination of MERS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2 or other coronaviruses in camels
    Supplementary recommendations for the epidemiological investigation of SARS-CoV-2 in exposed animals
    2021
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    Dromedary camels are the main reservoir for Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV). Genetic analysis of MERS-CoV isolates from humans and dromedaries revealed that direction of transmission is from camels to humans. Furthermore, several studies reported evidence of camel infection by other human CoVs, animal CoVs or unknown coronaviruses. There is evidence of recombination between different betacoronaviruses in camels. Analysis of the Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 receptor (ACE2) binding in dromedaries predicted potential binding affinity to the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) receptor binding domain (RBD), however some other studies predicted the contrary. With the pandemic spread of SARS-CoV-2, it is not a matter of if but rather when camels will be exposed to SARS-CoV-2 in these countries. Co-circulation of both viruses in the same host can favour virus recombination, and may lead to increased virulence in animals and/or humans if the recombinant virus incorporates pathogenicity of MERS-CoV with the transmissibility of SARS-CoV-2. Further investigations into camel susceptibility to SARS-CoV-2, the possibility for recombination between MERS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2 or other coronaviruses in camels, and the associated zoonotic potential are therefore urgently required to ensure early-detection of such events.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Influenza and other zoonotic diseases at the human-animal interface
    FAO/OIE/WHO Joint Scientific Consultation, 27-29 April 2010, Verona (Italy)
    2011
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    Given the complexity of zoonotic disease emergence in an increasingly globalized world, effective strategies for reducing future threats must be identified. Lessons learned from past experiences controlling diseases such as severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI), and pandemic (H1N1) 2009, indicate that new paradigms are needed for early detection, prevention, and control to reduce persistent global threats from influenza and other emerging zoonotic dis eases. The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE), and the World Health Organization (WHO), in collaboration with the Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale delle Venezie (IZSVe) organised a joint scientific consultation in Verona, Italy (27-29 April 2010) entitled “FAO-OIE-WHO Joint Scientific Consultation on Influenza and Other Emerging Zoonotic Diseases at the Human-Animal Interface". This document is a summary of the consu ltation. It provides examples of emerged or emerging zoonotic viral diseases. It describes commonalities across diseases and ideas for new approaches and suggests steps towards translating meeting outcomes into policy.

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