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Report of the International Emergency Disease Investigation Task Force on a Serious Finfish Disease in Southern Africa, 18 - 26 May 2007.








FAO. Report of the International Emergency Disease Investigation Task Force on a Serious Finfish Disease in Southern Africa, 18–26 May 2007. Rome, FAO. 2009. 70p.


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    Report of the International Emergency Fish Disease Investigation Mission on a Suspected Outbreak of Epizootic Ulcerative Syndrome (EUS) in the Democratic Republic of Congo, 13-19 March 2015 2017
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    In response to a request for an emergency technical assistance from the Government of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) in connection with a serious disease affecting fish in Lokame River in Loko and in Mbanza Oton, 60 km from Gbadolite, FAO formed an International Emergency Disease Investigation Task Force. The overall objective of the Task Force was to (1) confirm that an outbreak was happening; establish a case definition and presumptive diagnosis of the causative agent; (2) collect and process fish samples for relevant laboratory tests; (3) identify risk factors, confirm diagnosis and define further investigation or follow-up work; (4) recommend border/cross border control measures to prevent further spread of the disease; (5) identify specific short-term and medium-term biosecurity action plans that the government may undertake; and (6) provide further recommendations to FAO on how to prevent the further spread of the disease. Some members of the Task Force travelled to DRC from 13 to 19 March 2015, conducted field investigations and laboratory test and has confirmed the presence of the epizootic ulcerative syndrome (EUS) using three recommended confirmatory tests such as: (i) demonstration of mycotic granulomas and fungal structures in stained histological sections, (ii) isolation of Aphanomyces invadans on culture media and (iii) positive identification by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of A. invadans genomic DNA. The Task Force concluded that permissive facto rs that favoured the propagation, infectivity and disease occurrence of EUS occur in the rivers and streams investigated in the Equateur Province of DRC. The findings also showed that environmental, climatic, water quality and human demographic conditions in the Congo River basin support the possibility of pandemic spread of the disease. The Task Force suggested several actions which need to be undertaken to curb the spread of the outbreak. These include active surveillance and monitoring of fi sh markets and other food channels used in the movement of live fish, capacity building for involved government personnel to strengthen knowledge and expertise in the identification and control of the disease through biosecurity measures, continued dialogue among DRC, neighbouring countries and FAO about EUS status including subregional disease surveillance, monitoring, and response programmes, and the formulation of a national aquatic biosecurity strategy for DRC.
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    Document
    What you need to know about epizootic ulcerative syndrome (EUS) - An extension brochure 2009
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    This extension brochure – What you need to know about epizootic ulcerative syndrome (EUS) – provides simple facts or frequently asked questions about EUS. This brochure is intended to a wide range of audience from fish farmers and fishermen to extension officers as well as policy-makers as a public information campaign to make available factual information about the disease so that awareness may be raised for better understanding of its potential impact.This brochure, an outcome of FAO’s Techni cal Cooperation Project TCP/RAF/3111 Emergency Assistance to Combat Epizootic Ulcerative Syndrome in the Chobe/Zambezi River System, was prepared under the technical supervision of Dr Melba B. Reantaso and Dr Rohana P. Subasinghe of the Aquaculture Management and Conservation Service, Fisheries and Aquaculture Management Division, FAO Fisheries and Aquaculture Department.
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    Journal, magazine, bulletin
    FAO Food Chain Crisis Early Warning Bulletin
    Forecasting threats to the food chain affecting food security in countries and regions. No. 30, January-March 2019
    2019
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    During the period January to March 2019, Food Chain Crisis (FCC) threats are expected to occur in Africa, the Americas, Asia and Europe, where they may persist within a country, spread to neighbouring countries, remain latent, or re-emerge or amplify. The dynamics and likelihood of occurrence of FCC threats depend on a number of risk factors or drivers. These include agro-ecological factors (intensive farming systems, deforestation, overgrazing, etc.), climate change (such as droughts, extreme weather events, flooding, heavy rains, heatwaves, the El Niño-Southern Oscillation - ENSO or changes in vegetation cover or water temperature), human behaviour (cultural practices, conflicts and civil insecurity, trade, etc.) and natural disasters. In relation to food security, and according to the latest Crop Prospects and Food Situation report (January- March 2019), FAO estimates that, globally, 40 countries (31 in Africa, 8 in Asia, and 1 in the Americas) are in need of external assistance for food. Persisting conflicts continue to be the dominant factor driving high levels of severe food insecurity. Weather shocks have also adversely affected food availability and access. FCC threats might compound food insecurity in fragile countries stricken by weather shocks and conflicts. Twenty-nine plant and forest pests and diseases, locusts and animal and aquatic diseases were monitored and forecasted by FAO experts for the period January-March 2019. A total of 275 forecasts were conducted in 120 countries. According to the forecasts, the following pests and diseases represent a high to moderate risk to the food chain in some countries for the period January-March 2019: Rift Valley fever (RVF) in Africa, African swine fever (ASF) in Asia and Europe, Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD), Avian influenza (AI) in Africa and Asia, and Peste des petits ruminants (PPR) in Africa, Asia and Europe for Animal diseases and zoonoses; Fall armyworm (FAW), Banana fusarium wilt disease (BFWD) and Cassava mosaic disease (CMD) in Africa and Asia, and Cassava brown streak disease (CBSD), Wheat rust and Banana bunchy top disease (BBTD) in Africa for Plant pests and diseases; Desert Locust in Africa and Asia for Locusts; and Blue gum chalcid, Red gum lerp psyllid, Bronze bug and Polyphagous shot hole borer (PSHB) in Africa, Dry cone syndrome in Asia, Bark beetles in Europe and the Americas, and Pine processionary moth in Europe for Forest pests and diseases; Tilapia Lake Virus in the in the Americas and Asia, and Acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND) in Asia for Aquatic diseases.

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