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Ethiopia: Response Overview (December 2022)









FAO. 2023. Ethiopia – Response overview, December 2022. Rome.



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    Book (series)
    Final evaluation of "Pursuing pastoralist resilience through improved animal health service delivery in pastoralist areas of Ethiopia
    Project code: GCP/ETH/083/EC
    2020
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    Small ruminants are the main source of livelihood for the rural agropastoralists and are important assets in lowlands and highlands of Ethiopia. Transboundary animal diseases (TADs) are a significant cause of reduced production and productivity to the pastoral communities in Ethiopia. TADs like Peste des Petits Ruminants (PPR), Sheep and Goat Pox (SGP) and Contagious Caprine Pleuropneumonia (CCPP) have contributed to a high level of sheep and goat mortality, especially in lambs and kids. The “Pursuing pastoralist resilience through improved animal health service delivery” project implemented by FAO between 2014 and 2020, was designed to support the Government of Ethiopia in strengthening the surveillance system for most TADs. The project had a primary focus to implement a progressive control programme for Peste des Petits Ruminants (PPR). The evaluation found that the project has advanced PPR control and eradication and that the country has the capability to continue this momentum for improved animal health and welfare services for the greater ambition to eradicate PPR across the country by 2027. However, ensuring the effectiveness and sustainability of future projects requires overcoming many difficulties. Challenges relating to government strategy, coordination, resources and more are assessed in this report.
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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Nutrition-sensitive cash+ in Somalia
    Combining cash payments, nutrition education and provision of agricultural and livestock inputs to increase food security and improve diets of drought-affected pastoralists and farmers
    2020
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    In 2016 and 2017, a drought led to large-scale food insecurity across Somalia, affecting more than six million people, including over 900,000 children under the age of five likely to be acutely malnourished. Following the two-year drought, in 2018, heavy rains led to flooding in the southern part of the country. This severely affected farmers’ ability to cultivate during the following season. In response to this emergency, in 2018 the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) adopted a programmatic nutrition-sensitive Cash+ approach funded mainly by the World Bank through the “Somalia emergency drought response and recovery project”. This approach was further streamlined by the cash+ livestock projects funded by the Office of U.S. Foreign Disaster Assistance (OFDA). FAO’s Cash+ is a cash transfer modality that pairs unconditional cash transfers with productive inputs, assets and/or technical training, aimed at supporting beneficiaries to address immediate needs while also engaging in productive activities. Depending on the beneficiary groups, FAO provides Cash+ crop, livestock, or fish packages. In short, cash+ interventions seek to enhance the food security, nutrition and income generation potential of vulnerable households. Against this background, this promising practice explores how Cash+ model in Somalia can contribute to improving diets and food security of pastoralist and farming communities.
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    Document
    Productive Impact of Ethiopia’s Social Cash Transfer Pilot Programme
    A From Protection to Production (PtoP) report
    2016
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    This report uses data from a two-year impact evaluation to analyse the impact of the Ethiopia Social Cash Transfer Pilot Programme (SCTPP) on household behaviour and decision-making, including agricultural production and other income-generating activities, labour supply, the accumulation of productive assets, access to credit and food security. The general framework for empirical analysis is based on a comparison of programme beneficiaries with a group of controls interviewed in 2012 and again t wo years later, using difference-in-difference (or double difference) estimators combined with propensity score matching methods. The findings show that the programme significantly increased household food security and decreased the number of hours children spend on household chores and activities. The programme is also associated with increases in social capital, and subjective well-being. However, the effects of the SCTPP on the accumulation of productive assets and on agricultural production are mixed. The analysis reveals important heterogeneity in programme impacts, with estimated magnitudes varying over geographical area and over gender of the household head.

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