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Integrated Ocean Management: Fisheries oil and gas and seabed mining












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    Booklet
    FAO working for SDG 14 2017
    Healthy oceans and seas are more important than ever. Oceans and seas cover more than 70 percent of our planet’s surface, provide half of the world’s oxygen, sequester carbon, and serve as home to 80 percent of life on earth. SDG 14, Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development, is a major goal of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, which commits the international community to act to surmount the key challenges facing our planet and all those who live on it. A focus on SDG 14 will be crucial to protecting marine resources, and the important role they play in human well-being and social and economic development worldwide. Through monitoring, instruments, both binding and non-binding, and other activities, FAO is working with countries to achieve SDG 14 objectives, addressing linkages with other targets of the 2030 Agenda and ensuring sustainable development in all three dimensions. This booklet shines a light on FAO’s work with countries and partners across the globe to ensure our oceans, seas and marine resources are used sustainably for the benefit of present and future generations.
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    Peatlands – guidance for climate change mitigation through conservation, rehabilitation and sustainable use 2012
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    Peatland drainage - mainly for agriculture, grazing and forestry - and peat fires are responsible for almost one quarter of carbon emissions from the land use sector. Peatlands and organic soils contain 30 percent of the world’s soil carbon but only cover 3 percent of the Earth’s land area. Peatlands provide many important ecosystem services, including water regulation, biodiversity conservation, and carbon sequestration and storage. Through conservation, restoration and better management, organ ic soils and peatlands can make a substantial contribution to reducing atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations. This report provides information on management and finance options to achieve emissions reductions and enhance other vital ecosystem services from peatlands. A decision support tree guides users through potential options for the management of both cultivated and uncultivated peatlands. The report also summarizes the methodologies and data available for quantifying greenhouse gas emis sions from peatlands and organic soils. Practical approaches are presented concerning measuring, reporting and verification, and accounting of greenhouse gas emissions. Country-specific case studies illustrate the problems, solutions and opportunities associated with peatland management. This report is a handbook for policy-makers, technical audiences and others interested in peatlands. This is the second edition of the report, which was first published in May 2012. The second edition has new in formation concerning grazing on peatlands and updates related to the finance options as well as measuring, reporting and verifying emissions and emission reductions. The authors of the report welcome any feedback or input (micca@fao.org) and hope that the information provided may support efforts to make a meaningful contribution to combat climate change through conservation, rehabilitation and sustainable use of peatland.
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    Booklet
    Not a drop in the ocean
    Key successes Common Oceans ABNJ Program 2014-2019
    2021
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    Oceans are essential to life on earth. They help regulate our climate and produce oxygen for us to breathe. They also provide food, jobs, energy and transport for millions of people around the world. Yet, our oceans are in peril. Overfishing, pollution and climate change are some of the threats facing the marine environment, as well as the supply of goods and services oceans provide to humankind. The need to protect the oceans is gaining momentum on the international agenda and global action is being taken, targeting even the ocean’s remotest parts, known as the areas beyond national jurisdiction (ABNJ) – which cover over 60 percent of the ocean’s surface and 40 percent of the planet’s surface. Far from land, outside national boundaries, the complex management of the rich marine resources and biodiversity of the ABNJ requires international cooperation. This has improved since the UN Convention for the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS) was adopted in 1982. Nevertheless, challenges remain to achieve the responsible and sustainable use of these important ecosystems. To contribute to meet these goals, the Common Oceans ABNJ Program brought together global stakeholders and partners to promote the sustainable use of fisheries and the protection of marine biodiversity in the ABNJ. The Program, funded by the Global Environment Facility (GEF) and led by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), involved the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) and the World Bank Group (WBG), as well as Regional Fisheries Management Organizations (RFMOs) and other intergovernmental organizations, national governments, the private sector, civil society and academia. This report presents the results obtained by the Common Oceans ABNJ Program between 2014-2019. It highlights the value, importance and benefits of sustainably managing fisheries and biodiversity conservation in the ABNJ, and how the collateral impact of fishing is less harmful to the marine environment now than when the program started out in 2014.

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