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Paying for cultural ecosystem services: the case of open space sects (Vapostori) in Bulawayo metropolitan province, Zimbabwe

XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022









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    Paying for cultural ecosystem services: the case of open space sects (Vapostori) in Bulawayo metropolitan province, Zimbabwe
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
    Also available in:
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    While religious entities have targeted ecosystem-service producing biodiversity in cities for worship purposes, this human encroachment by the itinerant Open Space Worship (OSW) Sects in Zimbabwe has pushed the frontiers of religion-environment component of the socio-ecological systems framework to conflictual relations. Due to the importance of urban green spaces’ function of carbon sequestration, scholars posit the quality of life in cities depends on locally produced ecosystem services. To ensure the delivery of urban ecosystem services there is need for assorted, multi-functional, and accessible blue and green infrastructure throughout our cities. It underscores the importance of green spaces in cities as key components of the socio-ecological systems framework where the natural forest wood serves as the carbon sink for sequestration and therefore human wellbeing. Anthropocentric OSW activities’ encroachment within these spaces calls for sustainable socio-ecological system management through responsive policies, which can benefit from the payment for ecosystem services using lease agreements and permits for open Worship Parks within cities to control access to the broader socio-ecological system (SESF) assets. All OSW sects studied in the City of Bulawayo use one form or another of ecosystem services and benefits, ranging from the provisioning, regulating, supporting and cultural ecosystem services. Open space worship sects are prepared to pay in cash for value accrued from green spaces they use. The study particularly responds to the demands and aspirations of SDG 11: Sustainable Cities, Communities, and SDGOAL 12: Responsible Consumption and Production. Keywords: Sustainable cities, communities, ecosystem-service, socio-ecological system, pen-space worship sects ID: 3487348
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    Enhancing economic agro-forestry for livelihood opportunity via ecosystem restoration: A case study
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Meghalaya, a North Eastern state of India with its economy tied to natural resource-base and climate- sensitive sectors as agriculture, water, forestry. Encroachment of forest land for agricultural activity, overexploitation of biodiversity, unsustainable agricultural practices (slash & burn) and non-scientific mining resulted in habitat degradation and pollution. India Water Foundation, as development partner with Meghalaya Basin Development Authority (MBDA) under Integrated Basin Development Livelihood Program designed on Knowledge Management, Natural resource Management, Entrepreneurship Development and Good Governance through demand driven partnership madeefforts towards Ecosystem restoration, linking forest, agriculture and water as most of economic value depends on nature and its services. Forest plays an indispensable role to conserve ecological balance and biodiversity restoration and indigenous people worship sacred groves, preserve flora and fauna biodiversity and bamboo reserves dedicated to deities in Garo, Khasi and Jaintia hills served as water catchments to fulfil domestic, agricultural, customary needs. Green Mission promoted protection of catchments forests, improved forest & water foot print, diversified farmer's livelihood, income and food security. Opportunities from social to economic forestry prospered state's economy. Adapting to temperature and weather conditions, entrepreneurs cultivated tea, fruits, flowers, spices and medicinal plants & had market linkages, connectivity, cold storages and financial inclusion. Climate resilient practices like re-wilding, adaptive management augmented sustainable green cover and restored water-land-biomass balance, promoted carbon sequestration and water-energy-food security nexus. Keywords: Biodiversity conservation, Sustainable forest management, Deforestation and forest degradation, Gender, Economic Development ID: 3486365
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    Modeling CO2 restoration potential of mangrove ecosystems in Pakistan to support urban green spaces and human well-being
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Abstract: Pakistan is facing major climate change challenges since in recent years, the annual mean temperature has increased by 0.5°C in the country. Karachi is the largest city and highly vulnerable to fatal heatwave events trolling maximum deaths and illness in recent years. Coast of Mangrove Forest (MF) plays an important role in daily temperature, local environment, and microclimatic conditions. It is a well-established scientific reality that carbon traps heat in the air, and now observing a dramatic rise in temperature. The study aimed to evaluate the vulnerability of the communities to heat-stress, and categorize the role of Mangrove Ecosystem Services to mitigate future disasters. Coupled models and GIS/RS tools were used to estimate the suitability of MF land-cover to categorize the latent status. Heatwaves during summer for three days were calibrated by the models which resulted that an inundation of CO2 stress factors, 250 (S-u=1.0) with a rise in temperature up to 44°C with 70% humidity causes more deaths under heat-periods. Our results linked heatwaves with climate warming and extreme weather events, aggravated by rapid urbanization, industrialization, deforestation, emission of CO2, degradation of MF, and land-use change. Moreover, findings revealed that there is a significant drop-off in urban greenspaces and growth in built-up areas during 1984-2016. In addition, the SILVA-model projected that MF around the city has the ability to absorb CO2 emission up to 55.4 million tons. SILVA-growth projected that 43.61% CO2 stock can be deposited by MF which contributes 19% of the ecosystem. Model showcase that rehabilitation of 30-mangrove trees per/100m2 possibly reduce the extreme tide of heat stress, tsunami, CO2, and improve the air-quality index of the city. This study provides initial assessment and policy directions to rehabilitate MF to promote sustainable cities and societies. Key Words: CO2, urban green spaces, disaster risk reduction, extreme weather events ID: 3471412

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