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Certificate presented to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations to confirm the voluntary cancellation of 35,675 Adaptation Fund Certified Emission Reductions








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    Article
    Organic Agriculture and Climate Change 2010
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    This article discusses the mitigation and adaptation potential of organic agricultural systems along three main features: farming system design, cropland management and grassland and livestock management. An important potential contribution of organically managed systems to climate change mitigation is identified in the careful management of nutrients and, hence, the reduction of N2O emissions from soils. Another high mitigation potential of organic agriculture lies in carbon sequestration in so ils. In a first estimate, the emission reduction potential by abstention from mineral fertilizers is calculated to be about 20% and the compensation potential by carbon sequestration to be about 40–72% of the world’s current annual agricultural greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, but further research is needed to consolidate these numbers. On the adaptation side, organic agriculture systems have a strong potential for building resilient food systems in the face of uncertainties, through farm diversi fication and building soil fertility with organic matter. Additionally, organic agriculture offers alternatives to energy-intensive production inputs such as synthetic fertilizers which are likely to be further limited for poor rural populations by rising energy prices. In developing countries, organic agricultural systems achieve equal or even higher yields, as compared to the current conventional practices, which translate into a potentially important option for food security and sustainable l ivelihoods for the rural poor in times of climate change. Certified organic products cater for higher income options for farmers and, therefore, can serve as promoters for climate-friendly farming practices worldwide
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    Document
    Community forest certification and stakeholders cooperation: An inclusive approach to enhance community capacity while meeting market demand on sustainably-certified products
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Community forestry has begun a way to manage forest by involving surrounding communities. Indonesia has 2.6 million hectares of community forest with potential wood stock 74.7 million m3 (Ministry of Forestry Statistical Report, 2014). It is also indicated that the amount of timber harvested by communities has increased during the last decade, reaching more than 5 million m3 annually. When the logs production from the community forest tends to increase, its wood stock sustainability becomes concern to some stakeholders. Further, community forest holders who are typically small scale operations also become a consideration in implementing community forest certification. The study focus on the approach of IFCC and PEFC in building community forest certification scheme as a tool to enhance community capacity in managing the forest whilst also as a market-based instrument by linking market demands of sustainably-certified products with its producers. IFCC[1] has developed the community forest certification system with its objective to cooperate with multi stakeholders in enhancing community capacity to manage forest sustainably and meet the market demand. The development of IFCC standard for community forest was implemented in manners that are open, transparent and consensus-based.


    [1] IFCC is an organization of scheme owner and developer of sustainable forest management in Indonesia which has been endorsed by Programme for the Endorsement of Forest Certification (PEFC) since 2014. Keywords: Adaptive and integrated management, Human health and well-being, Partnerships, Sustainable forest management, Value chain ID: 3484993
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Certification Costs and Managerial Skills under Different Organic Certification Schemes - Selected Case Studies 2007
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    Certification provides consumer confidence that organic production ensures food integrity from seed through sell. Certification also guarantees that production and processing are managed under a holistic system that enhances ecosystem health. Smallholders in developing countries face institutional and economic constraints in obtaining the status of certified organic producers. Despite the outstanding growth of organic markets over the last decade, certification costs and standards from the devel oped world prevent many smallholders in developing countries from entering these markets. Farmers seeking to sell organic products usually have to hire an organic certification agency to inspect farms annually and confirm that they adhere to the standards established by trading partners.

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