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Can budget support to the cotton sector be used more efficiently? An assessment of the policy support measures in Mali and Burkina Faso.











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    Assessing the policy environment for cash crops in Malawi: what could hinder the achievement of the National Export Strategy objectives? 2017
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    This paper examines the main issues affecting producers of export crops in Malawi that could compromise the attainment of the National Export Strategy (NES) 2013-2018 targets. The analysis assesses the level of policy support to the major export crops (cotton, groundnuts, sugar, tea and tobacco) for the period 2005-2013, by calculating the Nominal Rate of Protection (NRP), the Nominal Rate of Assistance (NRA) and the Market Development Gap (MDG) indicators for producers and by analysing public e xpenditure targeting the aforementioned commodities. The results show that trade and market policies resulted in disincentives of -15 percent on average for cash crop producers mainly due to poor infrastructure, lack of competition, weak enforcement and/or inefficiency of producer price policies, and limited budgetary support to cash crops value chain development. The analysis offers further evidence to guide the prioritization of policies and investments in view of fully attaining the NES objec tives, including facilitation of farmers’ access to markets, promotion of a more competitive environment for agri-business, and development of a transparent market information system.
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    Analysing beef price incentives to strengthen policies for production and exports in Uganda
    Technical note
    2023
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    In Uganda, 58 percent of households depend on livestock for their livelihoods, with cattle being the most important livestock subsector in the country. Despite natural pastures, water resources, and big demand in national and world markets, beef production in Uganda grew by only 1 percent in the last decade, and lags behind local demand. In the last decade, the government has adopted several policies within the framework of the National Development Plan, aimed at increasing domestic beef production and exports. This report assesses the effects of policy support on the beef sector in Uganda over the last four years (2017–2020), and also includes previous analysis on live cattle for the period 2005–2016. To measure price incentives, the study relies on renowned indicators; the nominal rate of protection, nominal rate of assistance and the market development gap. The results reveal that in the past (2011–2016) breeders were penalized by low prices, while recently they benefitted from prices above the international-equivalent, mainly due to restrictions on cattle movement due to a foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) outbreak, which increased domestic prices. The persistent gaps between domestic and international prices can also be explained by the very limited price transmission and weak market integration of the beef value chain in Uganda. FMD is a critical issue to tackle to improve beef commercialization and competitiveness, together with the significant value chain inefficiencies, such as high transport costs and the presence of informal fees, that still hinder marketing and profitability of this sector.
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    Monitoring and analysing food and agricultural policies in Africa – Synthesis report 2013 2013
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    The synthesis report by FAO’s Monitoring African Food and Agricultural Policies (MAFAP) team, is the first ever attempt to systematically analyze agriculture and food security policies in several African countries, using common methodology over years. The report found that in the period between 2005 and 2010, the policy environment and performance of domestic markets depressed producer prices in the ten African countries analyzed, though the trend is improving. Most governments resorted to m arket and trade policies to protect consumers and keep food prices down in the reference period whilst budgetary transfers, were mainly been used to support producers. The report concludes that producer prices would improve significantly if inefficiencies in domestic value chains were eliminated through better targeted policies. These inefficiencies however seem to be increasing in all ten countries surveyed. The current MAFAP partner countries are: Burkina Faso, Ethiopia, Ghana, Kenya, Mala wi, Mali, Mozambique, Nigeria, Tanzania and Uganda.

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