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Annex 6 Ndondomeko Yoteteza ku Chiopsyezo ku Chilengedwe ndi Ntchito Zokhudza Anthu (ESMF)






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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Integrated agriculture-aquaculture: an efficient use of resources 2024
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    Integrated agriculture-aquaculture is a sustainable development option. In integrated farming, the waste of one enterprise become inputs of another and, thus, optimize the use of resources and lessen pollution. Moreover, by integrating crops, vegetables, livestock, trees and fish, farming systems benefit from a diversity of genetic resources and the survival of beneficial insects and other wildlife. Production becomes more stable, with more efficient resource use and better environmental conservation. Importantly, this integrated approach can increase dietary diversity and raise consumption of fish with the corresponding nutritional benefits. The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) has supported integrated agriculture-aquaculture projects across Asia and Africa. In the Lao People's Democratic Republic, FAO has supported farmers as they revive the traditional practice of rice-fish farming by training them to use less rice seed, transplant younger seedlings, and make bio-fertilizer by producing liquid extracted from organic material. In Malawi, FAO trained farmers who were impacted by scarcer rainfall in integrated agriculture-aquaculture and provided them with equipment, fingerlings and fish feed. In Nigeria, FAO helped adapt the practice of rice-fish farming to the local context, training over 727 farmers, young graduate students and extension workers.
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    Book (series)
    Terminal evaluation of the project “Pesticide Risk Reduction in Malawi”
    Project code: GCP/MLW/052/GFF - GEF ID: 5109
    2024
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    This evaluation report of project GCP/MLW/052/GFF highlights the economic, environmental and social risks and challenges associated with the use of chemical pesticides in the agricultural sector in Malawi and provides a comprehensive assessment of the contribution of the project to reduce these risks, as well as to promote sustainable agricultural systems. The information comes from investigations conducted by a team of independent evaluators through a detailed analysis of project documents, interviews with project stakeholders and field visits. The report highlights the strengths and weaknesses of the project in terms of design, implementation, and achievement of results. It draws lessons and identifies the conditions to be put in place or strengthened to promote the consolidation of achievements, progress towards impact and sustainability in the context of Malawi. Recommendations addressed to the actors concerned are formulated in the report for this purpose.

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