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Spatio-temporal dynamics of air pollution and the delineation of hotspots in the Lao People's Democratic Republic

Executive summary









Tattaris, M., Yasmin, N., Khiewvongphachan, X., Henry, M., Jonckheere, I. & Ferrand, P. 2023. Spatio-temporal dynamics of air pollution and the delineation of hotspots in the Lao People's Democratic Republic – Executive summary. Rome, FAO.



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    In this report, the air pollution dynamics of the Lao People’s Democratic Republic are investigated given its increasing industrial and economic development, and the employment of frequent biomass burning as an agricultural practice. The Lao People’s Democratic Republic is also surrounded by countries that undergo recurrent agricultural burning, with strong winds at certain times in the year potentially resulting in transboundary pollution. The national information systems could better support actions that encourage the reduction of atmospheric pollution. The lack of an effective national system for air pollution monitoring magnifies the impacts of atmospheric pollution, particularly on health, climate, and agricultural inputs.
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